Cross validation in sparse linear regression with piecewise continuous nonconvex penalties and its acceleration

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We investigate the signal reconstruction performance of sparse linear regression in the presence of noise when piecewise continuous nonconvex penalties are used. Among such penalties, we focus on the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD) penalty. The contributions of this study are three-fold: We first present a theoretical analysis of a typical reconstruction performance, using the replica method, under the assumption that each component of the design matrix is given as an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian variable. This clarifies the superiority of the SCAD estimator compared with $\ell_1$ in a wide parameter range, although the nonconvex nature of the penalty tends to lead to solution multiplicity in certain regions. This multiplicity is shown to be connected to replica symmetry breaking in the spin-glass theory, and associated phase diagrams are given. We also show that the global minimum of the mean square error between the estimator and the true signal is located in the replica symmetric phase. Second, we develop an approximate formula efficiently computing the cross-validation error without actually conducting the cross-validation, which is also applicable to the non-i.i.d. design matrices. It is shown that this formula is only applicable to the unique solution region and tends to be unstable in the multiple solution region. We implement instability detection procedures, which allows the approximate formula to stand alone and resultantly enables us to draw phase diagrams for any specific dataset. Third, we propose an annealing procedure, called nonconvexity annealing, to obtain the solution path efficiently. Numerical simulations are conducted on simulated datasets to examine these results to verify the consistency of the theoretical results and the efficiency of the approximate formula and nonconvexity annealing.


Analytic solution and stationary phase approximation for the Bayesian lasso and elastic net

Neural Information Processing Systems

The lasso and elastic net linear regression models impose a double-exponential prior distribution on the model parameters to achieve regression shrinkage and variable selection, allowing the inference of robust models from large data sets. However, there has been limited success in deriving estimates for the full posterior distribution of regression coefficients in these models, due to a need to evaluate analytically intractable partition function integrals. Here, the Fourier transform is used to express these integrals as complex-valued oscillatory integrals over "regression frequencies". This results in an analytic expansion and stationary phase approximation for the partition functions of the Bayesian lasso and elastic net, where the non-differentiability of the double-exponential prior has so far eluded such an approach. Use of this approximation leads to highly accurate numerical estimates for the expectation values and marginal posterior distributions of the regression coefficients, and allows for Bayesian inference of much higher dimensional models than previously possible.


Analytic solution and stationary phase approximation for the Bayesian lasso and elastic net

Neural Information Processing Systems

The lasso and elastic net linear regression models impose a double-exponential prior distribution on the model parameters to achieve regression shrinkage and variable selection, allowing the inference of robust models from large data sets. However, there has been limited success in deriving estimates for the full posterior distribution of regression coefficients in these models, due to a need to evaluate analytically intractable partition function integrals. Here, the Fourier transform is used to express these integrals as complex-valued oscillatory integrals over "regression frequencies". This results in an analytic expansion and stationary phase approximation for the partition functions of the Bayesian lasso and elastic net, where the non-differentiability of the double-exponential prior has so far eluded such an approach. Use of this approximation leads to highly accurate numerical estimates for the expectation values and marginal posterior distributions of the regression coefficients, and allows for Bayesian inference of much higher dimensional models than previously possible.


Adaptive Sparseness Using Jeffreys Prior

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this paper we introduce a new sparseness inducing prior which does not involve any (hyper)parameters thatneed to be adjusted or estimated. Although other applications are possible, we focus here on supervised learning problems: regression and classification. Experiments withseveral publicly available benchmark data sets show that the proposed approach yields state-of-the-art performance. In particular, our method outperforms support vector machines and performs competitively with the best alternative techniques, both in terms of error rates and sparseness, although it involves no tuning or adjusting of sparsenesscontrolling hyper-parameters.


Accelerating Cross-Validation in Multinomial Logistic Regression with $\ell_1$-Regularization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We develop an approximate formula for evaluating a cross-validation estimator of predictive likelihood for multinomial logistic regression regularized by an $\ell_1$-norm. This allows us to avoid repeated optimizations required for literally conducting cross-validation; hence, the computational time can be significantly reduced. The formula is derived through a perturbative approach employing the largeness of the data size and the model dimensionality. Its usefulness is demonstrated on simulated data and the ISOLET dataset from the UCI machine learning repository.