Learning From What You Don't Observe

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The process of diagnosis involves learning about the state of a system from various observations of symptoms or findings about the system. Sophisticated Bayesian (and other) algorithms have been developed to revise and maintain beliefs about the system as observations are made. Nonetheless, diagnostic models have tended to ignore some common sense reasoning exploited by human diagnosticians; In particular, one can learn from which observations have not been made, in the spirit of conversational implicature. There are two concepts that we describe to extract information from the observations not made. First, some symptoms, if present, are more likely to be reported before others. Second, most human diagnosticians and expert systems are economical in their data-gathering, searching first where they are more likely to find symptoms present. Thus, there is a desirable bias toward reporting symptoms that are present. We develop a simple model for these concepts that can significantly improve diagnostic inference.


A Measure-Free Approach to Conditioning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In an earlier paper, a new theory of measurefree "conditional" objects was presented. In this paper, emphasis is placed upon the motivation of the theory. The central part of this motivation is established through an example involving a knowledge-based system. In order to evaluate combination of evidence for this system, using observed data, auxiliary at tribute and diagnosis variables, and inference rules connecting them, one must first choose an appropriate algebraic logic description pair (ALDP): a formal language or syntax followed by a compatible logic or semantic evaluation (or model). Three common choices- for this highly non-unique choice - are briefly discussed, the logics being Classical Logic, Fuzzy Logic, and Probability Logic. In all three,the key operator representing implication for the inference rules is interpreted as the often-used disjunction of a negation (b => a) = (b'v a), for any events a,b. However, another reasonable interpretation of the implication operator is through the familiar form of probabilistic conditioning. But, it can be shown - quite surprisingly - that the ALDP corresponding to Probability Logic cannot be used as a rigorous basis for this interpretation! To fill this gap, a new ALDP is constructed consisting of "conditional objects", extending ordinary Probability Logic, and compatible with the desired conditional probability interpretation of inference rules. It is shown also that this choice of ALDP leads to feasible computations for the combination of evidence evaluation in the example. In addition, a number of basic properties of conditional objects and the resulting Conditional Probability Logic are given, including a characterization property and a developed calculus of relations.


The combinatorial structure of beta negative binomial processes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We characterize the combinatorial structure of conditionally-i.i.d. sequences of negative binomial processes with a common beta process base measure. In Bayesian nonparametric applications, such processes have served as models for latent multisets of features underlying data. Analogously, random subsets arise from conditionally-i.i.d. sequences of Bernoulli processes with a common beta process base measure, in which case the combinatorial structure is described by the Indian buffet process. Our results give a count analogue of the Indian buffet process, which we call a negative binomial Indian buffet process. As an intermediate step toward this goal, we provide a construction for the beta negative binomial process that avoids a representation of the underlying beta process base measure. We describe the key Markov kernels needed to use a NB-IBP representation in a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm targeting a posterior distribution.


Anthropic decision theory

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper sets out to resolve how agents ought to act in the Sleeping Beauty problem and various related anthropic (self-locating belief) problems, not through the calculation of anthropic probabilities, but through finding the correct decision to make. It creates an anthropic decision theory (ADT) that decides these problems from a small set of principles. By doing so, it demonstrates that the attitude of agents with regards to each other (selfish or altruistic) changes the decisions they reach, and that it is very important to take this into account. To illustrate ADT, it is then applied to two major anthropic problems and paradoxes, the Presumptuous Philosopher and Doomsday problems, thus resolving some issues about the probability of human extinction.


A Bayesian Methodology towards Automatic Ontology Mapping

AAAI Conferences

This paper presents our ongoing effort on developing a principled methodology for automatic ontology mapping based on BayesOWL, a probabilistic framework we developed for modeling uncertainty in semantic web. The proposed method includes four components: 1) learning probabilities (priors about concepts, conditionals between subconcepts and superconcepts, and raw semantic similarities between concepts in two different ontologies) using Naïve Bayes text classification technique, by explicitly associating a concept with a group of sample documents retrieved and selected automatically from World Wide Web (WWW); 2) representing in OWL the learned probability information concerning the entities and relations in given ontologies; 3) using the BayesOWL framework to automatically translate given ontologies into the Bayesian network (BN) structures and to construct the conditional probability tables (CPTs) of a BN from those learned priors or conditionals, with reasoning services within a single ontology supported by Bayesian inference; and 4) taking a set of learned initial raw similarities as input and finding new mappings between concepts from two different ontologies as an application of our formalized BN mapping theory that is based on evidential reasoning across two BNs.