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A Study on Dialogue Reward Prediction for Open-Ended Conversational Agents

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The amount of dialogue history to include in a conversational agent is often underestimated and/or set in an empirical and thus possibly naive way. This suggests that principled investigations into optimal context windows are urgently needed given that the amount of dialogue history and corresponding representations can play an important role in the overall performance of a conversational system. This paper studies the amount of history required by conversational agents for reliably predicting dialogue rewards. The task of dialogue reward prediction is chosen for investigating the effects of varying amounts of dialogue history and their impact on system performance. Experimental results using a dataset of 18K human-human dialogues report that lengthy dialogue histories of at least 10 sentences are preferred (25 sentences being the best in our experiments) over short ones, and that lengthy histories are useful for training dialogue reward predictors with strong positive correlations between target dialogue rewards and predicted ones.


Subgoal Discovery for Hierarchical Dialogue Policy Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Developing conversational agents to engage in complex dialogues is challenging partly because the dialogue policy needs to explore a large state-action space. In this paper, we propose a divide-and-conquer approach that discovers and exploits the hidden structure of the task to enable efficient policy learning. First, given a set of successful dialogue sessions, we present a Subgoal Discovery Network (SDN) to divide a complex goal-oriented task into a set of simpler subgoals in an unsupervised fashion. We then use these subgoals to learn a hierarchical policy which consists of 1) a top-level policy that selects among subgoals, and 2) a low-level policy that selects primitive actions to accomplish the subgoal. We exemplify our method by building a dialogue agent for the composite task of travel planning. Experiments with simulated and real users show that an agent trained with automatically discovered subgoals performs competitively against an agent with human-defined subgoals, and significantly outperforms an agent without subgoals. Moreover, we show that learned subgoals are human comprehensible.


Semi-Supervised Dialogue Policy Learning via Stochastic Reward Estimation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Dialogue policy optimization often obtains feedback until task completion in task-oriented dialogue systems. This is insufficient for training intermediate dialogue turns since supervision signals (or rewards) are only provided at the end of dialogues. To address this issue, reward learning has been introduced to learn from state-action pairs of an optimal policy to provide turn-by-turn rewards. This approach requires complete state-action annotations of human-to-human dialogues (i.e., expert demonstrations), which is labor intensive. To overcome this limitation, we propose a novel reward learning approach for semi-supervised policy learning. The proposed approach learns a dynamics model as the reward function which models dialogue progress (i.e., state-action sequences) based on expert demonstrations, either with or without annotations. The dynamics model computes rewards by predicting whether the dialogue progress is consistent with expert demonstrations. We further propose to learn action embeddings for a better generalization of the reward function. The proposed approach outperforms competitive policy learning baselines on MultiWOZ, a benchmark multi-domain dataset.


How to build smarter chatbots

#artificialintelligence

We're going to be blunt: Chatbots in their current form aren't great. We were promised bots that would change the way we interact with businesses and services, but instead we have interactive bots that perform worse than apps. They are primarily focused on taps or interactive graphical interfaces, and conversing with them using natural language is nearly impossible. Take an example of Poncho Weather on Facebook Messenger. Let's say I'm going to a conference next Monday in San Diego and want to know what the forecast is.


Reward-Balancing for Statistical Spoken Dialogue Systems using Multi-objective Reinforcement Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Reinforcement learning is widely used for dialogue policy optimization where the reward function often consists of more than one component, e.g., the dialogue success and the dialogue length. In this work, we propose a structured method for finding a good balance between these components by searching for the optimal reward component weighting. To render this search feasible, we use multi-objective reinforcement learning to significantly reduce the number of training dialogues required. We apply our proposed method to find optimized component weights for six domains and compare them to a default baseline.