Probabilistic Class-Specific Discriminant Analysis

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Abstract--In this paper we formulate a probabilistic model for class-specific discriminant subspace learning. The proposed model can naturally incorporate the multi-modal structure of the negative class, which is neglected by existing methods. Moreover, it can be directly used to define a probabilistic classification rule in the discriminant subspace. We show that existing class-specific discriminant analysis methods are special cases of the proposed probabilistic model and, by casting them as probabilistic models, they can be extended to class-specific classifiers. We illustrate the performance of the proposed model, in comparison with that of related methods, in both verification and classification problems.


Robust Feature-Sample Linear Discriminant Analysis for Brain Disorders Diagnosis

Neural Information Processing Systems

A wide spectrum of discriminative methods is increasingly used in diverse applications for classification or regression tasks. However, many existing discriminative methods assume that the input data is nearly noise-free, which limits their applications to solve real-world problems. Particularly for disease diagnosis, the data acquired by the neuroimaging devices are always prone to different sources of noise. Robust discriminative models are somewhat scarce and only a few attempts have been made to make them robust against noise or outliers. These methods focus on detecting either the sample-outliers or feature-noises.


Optimal variable selection in multi-group sparse discriminant analysis

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This article considers the problem of multi-group classification in the setting where the number of variables $p$ is larger than the number of observations $n$. Several methods have been proposed in the literature that address this problem, however their variable selection performance is either unknown or suboptimal to the results known in the two-group case. In this work we provide sharp conditions for the consistent recovery of relevant variables in the multi-group case using the discriminant analysis proposal of Gaynanova et al., 2014. We achieve the rates of convergence that attain the optimal scaling of the sample size $n$, number of variables $p$ and the sparsity level $s$. These rates are significantly faster than the best known results in the multi-group case. Moreover, they coincide with the optimal minimax rates for the two-group case. We validate our theoretical results with numerical analysis.


Compressive Regularized Discriminant Analysis of High-Dimensional Data with Applications to Microarray Studies

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose a modification of linear discriminant analysis, referred to as compressive regularized discriminant analysis (CRDA), for analysis of high-dimensional datasets. CRDA is specially designed for feature elimination purpose and can be used as gene selection method in microarray studies. CRDA lends ideas from $\ell_{q,1}$ norm minimization algorithms in the multiple measurement vectors (MMV) model and utilizes joint-sparsity promoting hard thresholding for feature elimination. A regularization of the sample covariance matrix is also needed as we consider the challenging scenario where the number of features (variables) is comparable or exceeding the sample size of the training dataset. A simulation study and four examples of real-life microarray datasets evaluate the performances of CRDA based classifiers. Overall, the proposed method gives fewer misclassification errors than its competitors, while at the same time achieving accurate feature selection.


Robust Feature-Sample Linear Discriminant Analysis for Brain Disorders Diagnosis

Neural Information Processing Systems

A wide spectrum of discriminative methods is increasingly used in diverse applications for classification or regression tasks. However, many existing discriminative methods assume that the input data is nearly noise-free, which limits their applications to solve real-world problems. Particularly for disease diagnosis, the data acquired by the neuroimaging devices are always prone to different sources of noise. Robust discriminative models are somewhat scarce and only a few attempts have been made to make them robust against noise or outliers. These methods focus on detecting either the sample-outliers or feature-noises. Moreover, they usually use unsupervised de-noising procedures, or separately de-noise the training and the testing data. All these factors may induce biases in the learning process, and thus limit its performance. In this paper, we propose a classification method based on the least-squares formulation of linear discriminant analysis, which simultaneously detects the sample-outliers and feature-noises. The proposed method operates under a semi-supervised setting, in which both labeled training and unlabeled testing data are incorporated to form the intrinsic geometry of the sample space. Therefore, the violating samples or feature values are identified as sample-outliers or feature-noises, respectively. We test our algorithm on one synthetic and two brain neurodegenerative databases (particularly for Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease). The results demonstrate that our method outperforms all baseline and state-of-the-art methods, in terms of both accuracy and the area under the ROC curve.