Designing communication systems via iterative improvement: error correction coding with Bayes decoder and codebook optimized for source symbol error

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In error correction coding (ECC), the typical error metric is the bit error rate (BER) which measures the number of bit errors. For this metric, the positions of the bits are not relevant to the decoding, and in many noise models, not relevant to the BER either. In many applications this is unsatisfactory as typically all bits are not equal and have different significance. We look at ECC from a Bayesian perspective and introduce Bayes estimators with general loss functions to take into account the bit significance. We propose ECC schemes that optimize this error metric. As the problem is highly nonlinear, traditional ECC construction techniques are not applicable and we use iterative improvement search techniques to find good codebooks. We provide numerical experiments to show that they can be superior to classical linear block codes such as Hamming codes and decoding methods such as minimum distance decoding.


Software for Data Mining, Analytics,Data Science, and Knowledge Discovery

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Classification software: building models to separate 2 or more discrete classes using Multiple methods Decision Tree Rules Neural Bayesian SVM Genetic, Rough Sets, Fuzzy Logic and other approaches Analysis of results, ROC Social Network Analysis, Link Analysis, and Visualization software Text Analysis, Text Mining, and Information Retrieval (IR) Web Analytics and Social Media Analytics software. BI (Business Intelligence), Database and OLAP software Data Transformation, Data Cleaning, Data Cleansing Libraries, Components and Developer Kits for creating embedded data mining applications Web Content Mining, web scraping, screen scraping.


Microsoft, Machine Learning, And "Data Wrangling": ML Leverages Business Intelligence For B2B

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"Data wrangling" was an interesting phrase to hear in the machine learning (ML) presentations at Microsoft Ignite. Interesting because data wrangling is from business intelligence (BI), not from artificial intelligence (AI). Microsoft understands ML incorporates concepts from both disciplines. Further discussions point to another key point: Microsoft understands that business-to-business (B2B) is just as fertile for ML as business-to-consumer (B2C). ML applications with the most press are voice, augmented reality and autonomous vehicles.


Testing for Families of Distributions via the Fourier Transform

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study the general problem of testing whether an unknown discrete distribution belongs to a specified family of distributions. More specifically, given a distribution family P and sample access to an unknown discrete distribution D , we want to distinguish (with high probability) between the case that D in P and the case that D is ε-far, in total variation distance, from every distribution in P . This is the prototypical hypothesis testing problem that has received significant attention in statistics and, more recently, in computer science. The main contribution of this work is a simple and general testing technique that is applicable to all distribution families whose Fourier spectrum satisfies a certain approximate sparsity property. We apply our Fourier-based framework to obtain near sample-optimal and computationally efficient testers for the following fundamental distribution families: Sums of Independent Integer Random Variables (SIIRVs), Poisson Multinomial Distributions (PMDs), and Discrete Log-Concave Distributions. For the first two, ours are the first non-trivial testers in the literature, vastly generalizing previous work on testing Poisson Binomial Distributions. For the third, our tester improves on prior work in both sample and time complexity.


Testing for Families of Distributions via the Fourier Transform

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study the general problem of testing whether an unknown discrete distribution belongs to a specified family of distributions. More specifically, given a distribution family P and sample access to an unknown discrete distribution P, we want to distinguish (with high probability) between the case that P P and the case that P is ɛ-far, in total variation distance, from every distribution in P. This is the prototypical hypothesis testing problem that has received significant attention in statistics and, more recently, in computer science. The main contribution of this work is a simple and general testing technique that is applicable to all distribution families whose Fourier spectrum satisfies a certain approximate sparsity property. We apply our Fourier-based framework to obtain near sample-optimal and computationally efficienttesters for the following fundamental distribution families: Sums of Independent Integer Random Variables (SIIRVs), Poisson Multinomial Distributions (PMDs), and Discrete Log-Concave Distributions. For the first two, ours are the first nontrivial testers in the literature, vastly generalizing previous work on testing Poisson Binomial Distributions. For the third, our tester improves on prior work in both sample and time complexity.