NHS cyber attack used US government software leaked by WikiLeaks

The Independent - Tech

The ransomware that is wreaking havoc on NHS computers is believed to be using an NSA cyber-weapon leaked in WikiLeaks' Vault 7 release earlier this year. Malware called Wanna Detector is preventing hospital staff from accessing medical records. Hospitals in both England and Scotland are known to be affected. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


'I was shocked it was so easy': meet the professor who says facial recognition can tell if you're gay

The Guardian

Vladimir Putin was not in attendance, but his loyal lieutenants were. On 14 July last year, the Russian prime minister, Dmitry Medvedev, and several members of his cabinet convened in an office building on the outskirts of Moscow. On to the stage stepped a boyish-looking psychologist, Michal Kosinski, who had been flown from the city centre by helicopter to share his research. "There was Lavrov, in the first row," he recalls several months later, referring to Russia's foreign minister. "You know, a guy who starts wars and takes over countries." Kosinski, a 36-year-old assistant professor of organisational behaviour at Stanford University, was flattered that the Russian cabinet would gather to listen to him talk. "Those guys strike me as one of the most competent and well-informed groups," he tells me. Kosinski's "stuff" includes groundbreaking research into technology, mass persuasion and artificial intelligence (AI) – research that inspired the creation of the political consultancy Cambridge Analytica. Five years ago, while a graduate student at Cambridge University, he showed how even benign activity on Facebook could reveal personality traits – a discovery that was later exploited by the data-analytics firm that helped put Donald Trump in the White House.


Cambridge Analytica: What is the company now embroiled in Facebook data controversy?

The Independent - Tech

British data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica is at the centre of controversy in the US and UK after two newspapers reported the company harvested personal data about Facebook users beginning in 2014. Best known for assisting the 2016 presidential campaign of US President Donald Trump, Cambridge Analytica is now facing a government search of its London office, questions from US state authorities, and a demand by Facebook that it submit to a forensic audit. The UK's Information Commissioner has announced she is seeking a warrant to probe the company's servers – and also that she was forced to tell Facebook to "stand down" its own enquiries after its auditors and lawyers visited Cambridge Analytica's offices. "Such a search would potentially compromise a regulatory investigation," Elizabeth Denham said. Here is some of what is known about Cambridge Analytica.


The exciting impact of artificial intelligence on everyday life

#artificialintelligence

From my Northern Irish vantage point, I coordinate and facilitate a collaborative network around AI. Our 30 members range from micro SMEs through to multinational organisations, such as Liberty IT and Allstate. As such, I am privy to an incredible range of AI based applications and solutions that are coming down the line, and I am always surprised at the pace of change in the industry. With every change, we need to take a few steps back and rethink how to frame the state of the art at that given time – so it's worth keeping in mind that what is state of the art at any given time may well be seen as mundane in just a few short months. For example, when the age of the AI personal assistant arrived with Google Assistant, Siri and Cortana, my framing focussed on trying to communicate that AI was no longer an abstract concept, but part of our everyday lives; albeit in a relatively limited manner. But it was only with the arrival of Amazon Alexa that many people were spending real money to own what is ultimately an AI product.


Facebook data misuse scandal affects "substantially" more than 50M, claims Wylie

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Chris Wylie, the former Cambridge Analytica employee turned whistleblower whose revelations about Facebook data being misused for political campaigning has wiped billions off the share price of the company in recent days and led to the FTC opening a fresh investigation, has suggested the scale of the data leak is substantially larger than has been reported so far. Giving evidence today, to a UK parliamentary select committee that's investigating the use of disinformation in political campaigning, Wylie said: "The 50 million number is what the media has felt safest to report -- because of the documentation that they can rely on -- but my recollection is that it was substantially higher than that. So my own view is it was much more than 50M." We've reached out to Facebook about Wylie's claim -- but at the time of writing the company had not provided a response. "There were several iterations of the Facebook harvesting project," Wylie also told the committee, fleshing out the process through which he says users' data was obtained by CA. "It first started as a very small pilot -- firstly to see, most simply, is this data matchable to an electoral register… We then scaled out slightly to make sure that [Cambridge University professor Alexsandr Kogan] could acquire data in the speed that he said he could [via a personality test app called thisisyourdigitallife deployed via Facebook's platform].