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Classifying with Gaussian Mixtures and Clusters

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this paper, we derive classifiers which are winner-take-all (WTA) approximations to a Bayes classifier with Gaussian mixtures for class conditional densities. The derived classifiers include clustering based algorithms like LVQ and k-Means. We propose a constrained rank Gaussian mixtures model and derive a WTA algorithm for it. Our experiments with two speech classification tasks indicate that the constrained rank model and the WTA approximations improve the performance over the unconstrained models. 1 Introduction A classifier assigns vectors from Rn (n dimensional feature space) to one of K classes, partitioning the feature space into a set of K disjoint regions. A Bayesian classifier builds the partition based on a model of the class conditional probability densities of the inputs (the partition is optimal for the given model).


Classifying with Gaussian Mixtures and Clusters

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this paper, we derive classifiers which are winner-take-all (WTA) approximations to a Bayes classifier with Gaussian mixtures for class conditional densities. The derived classifiers include clustering based algorithms like LVQ and k-Means. We propose a constrained rank Gaussian mixtures model and derive a WTA algorithm for it. Our experiments with two speech classification tasks indicate that the constrained rank model and the WTA approximations improve the performance over the unconstrained models. 1 Introduction A classifier assigns vectors from Rn (n dimensional feature space) to one of K classes, partitioning the feature space into a set of K disjoint regions. A Bayesian classifier builds the partition based on a model of the class conditional probability densities of the inputs (the partition is optimal for the given model).


Classifying with Gaussian Mixtures and Clusters

Neural Information Processing Systems

In this paper, we derive classifiers which are winner-take-all (WTA) approximations to a Bayes classifier with Gaussian mixtures for class conditional densities. The derived classifiers include clustering based algorithms like LVQ and k-Means. We propose a constrained rank Gaussian mixtures model and derive a WTA algorithm for it. Our experiments with two speech classification tasks indicate that the constrained rank model and the WTA approximations improve the performance over the unconstrained models. 1 Introduction A classifier assigns vectors from Rn (n dimensional feature space) to one of K classes, partitioning the feature space into a set of K disjoint regions. A Bayesian classifier builds the partition based on a model of the class conditional probability densities of the inputs (the partition is optimal for the given model).


A fast and efficient Modal EM algorithm for Gaussian mixtures

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In the modal approach to clustering, clusters are defined as the local maxima of the underlying probability density function, where the latter can be estimated either non-parametrically or using finite mixture models. Thus, clusters are closely related to certain regions around the density modes, and every cluster corresponds to a bump of the density. The Modal EM algorithm is an iterative procedure that can identify the local maxima of any density function. In this contribution, we propose a fast and efficient Modal EM algorithm to be used when the density function is estimated through a finite mixture of Gaussian distributions with parsimonious component-covariance structures. After describing the procedure, we apply the proposed Modal EM algorithm on both simulated and real data examples, showing its high flexibility in several contexts.


Gaussian Mixture Modeling with Gaussian Process Latent Variable Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Density modeling is notoriously difficult for high dimensional data. One approach to the problem is to search for a lower dimensional manifold which captures the main characteristics of the data. Recently, the Gaussian Process Latent Variable Model (GPLVM) has successfully been used to find low dimensional manifolds in a variety of complex data. The GPLVM consists of a set of points in a low dimensional latent space, and a stochastic map to the observed space. We show how it can be interpreted as a density model in the observed space. However, the GPLVM is not trained as a density model and therefore yields bad density estimates. We propose a new training strategy and obtain improved generalisation performance and better density estimates in comparative evaluations on several benchmark data sets.