Probabilistic Reasoning with Inconsistent Beliefs Using Inconsistency Measures

AAAI Conferences

The classical probabilistic entailment problem is to determine upper and lower bounds on the probability of formulas, given a consistent set of probabilistic assertions. We generalize this problem by omitting the consistency assumption and, thus, provide a general framework for probabilistic reasoning under inconsistency. To do so, we utilize inconsistency measures to determine probability functions that are closest to satisfying the knowledge base. We illustrate our approach on several examples and show that it has both nice formal and computational properties.


A Logical Study of Partial Entailment

AAAI Conferences

We introduce a novel logical notion-partial entailment-to propositional logic. In contrast with classical entailment, that a formula P partially entails another formula Q with respect to a background formula set Γ intuitively means that under the circumstance of Γ, if P is true then some "part" of Q will also be true. We distinguish three different kinds of partial entailments and formalize them by using an extended notion of prime implicant. We study their semantic properties, which show that, surprisingly, partial entailments fail for many simple inference rules. Then, we study the related computational properties, which indicate that partial entailments are relatively difficult to be computed. Finally, we consider a potential application of partial entailments in reasoning about rational agents.


A Logical Study of Partial Entailment

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

We introduce a novel logical notion--partial entailment--to propositional logic. In contrast with classical entailment, that a formula P partially entails another formula Q with respect to a background formula set \Gamma intuitively means that under the circumstance of \Gamma, if P is true then some "part" of Q will also be true. We distinguish three different kinds of partial entailments and formalize them by using an extended notion of prime implicant. We study their semantic properties, which show that, surprisingly, partial entailments fail for many simple inference rules. Then, we study the related computational properties, which indicate that partial entailments are relatively difficult to be computed. Finally, we consider a potential application of partial entailments in reasoning about rational agents.


Probabilistic logic

Classics

"Because many artificial intelligence applications require the ability to reason with uncertain knowledge, it is important to seek appropriate generalizations of logic for that case. We present here a semantical generalization of logic in which the truth values of sentences are probability values (between 0 and 1). Our generalization applies to any logical system for which the consistency of a finite set of sentences can be established. The method described in the present paper combines logic with probability theory in such a way that probabilistic logical entailment reduces to ordinary logical entailment when the probabilities of all sentences are either 0 or 1."See also: Probabilistic logic revisited, in Artificial Intelligence in Perspective, edited by Daniel Gureasko Bobrow, MIT Press, 1994.Artificial Intelligence, 28 (1), 71-87


Defeasible Reasoning in SROEL: from Rational Entailment to Rational Closure

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this work we study a rational extension $SROEL^R T$ of the low complexity description logic SROEL, which underlies the OWL EL ontology language. The extension involves a typicality operator T, whose semantics is based on Lehmann and Magidor's ranked models and allows for the definition of defeasible inclusions. We consider both rational entailment and minimal entailment. We show that deciding instance checking under minimal entailment is in general $\Pi^P_2$-hard, while, under rational entailment, instance checking can be computed in polynomial time. We develop a Datalog calculus for instance checking under rational entailment and exploit it, with stratified negation, for computing the rational closure of simple KBs in polynomial time.