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Guided Dialog Policy Learning without Adversarial Learning in the Loop

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Reinforcement-based training methods have emerged as the most popular choice to train an efficient and effective dialog policy. However, these methods are suffering from sparse and unstable reward signals usually returned from the user simulator at the end of the dialog. Besides, the reward signal is manually designed by human experts which requires domain knowledge. A number of adversarial learning methods have been proposed to learn the reward function together with the dialog policy. However, to alternatively update the dialog policy and the reward model on the fly, the algorithms to update the dialog policy are limited to policy gradient-based algorithms, such as REINFORCE and PPO. Besides, the alternative training of the dialog agent and the reward model can easily get stuck in local optimum or result in mode collapse. In this work, we propose to decompose the previous adversarial training into two different steps. We first train the discriminator with an auxiliary dialog generator and then incorporate this trained reward model to a common reinforcement learning method to train a high-quality dialog agent. This approach is applicable to both on-policy and off-policy reinforcement learning methods. By conducting several experiments, we show the proposed methods can achieve remarkable task success and its potential to transfer knowledge from existing domains to a new domain.


ConvLab-2: An Open-Source Toolkit for Building, Evaluating, and Diagnosing Dialogue Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We present ConvLab-2, an open-source toolkit that enables researchers to build task-oriented dialogue systems with state-of-the-art models, perform an end-to-end evaluation, and diagnose the weakness of systems. As the successor of ConvLab (Lee et al., 2019b), ConvLab-2 inherits ConvLab's framework but integrates more powerful dialogue models and supports more datasets. Besides, we have developed an analysis tool and an interactive tool to assist researchers in diagnosing dialogue systems. The analysis tool presents rich statistics and summarizes common mistakes from simulated dialogues, which facilitates error analysis and system improvement. The interactive tool provides a user interface that allows developers to diagnose an assembled dialogue system by interacting with the system and modifying the output of each system component.


Generalizable and Explainable Dialogue Generation via Explicit Action Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Response generation for task-oriented dialogues implicitly optimizes two objectives at the same time: task completion and language quality. Conditioned response generation serves as an effective approach to separately and better optimize these two objectives. Such an approach relies on system action annotations which are expensive to obtain. To alleviate the need of action annotations, latent action learning is introduced to map each utterance to a latent representation. However, this approach is prone to over-dependence on the training data, and the generalization capability is thus restricted. To address this issue, we propose to learn natural language actions that represent utterances as a span of words. This explicit action representation promotes generalization via the compositional structure of language. It also enables an explainable generation process. Our proposed unsupervised approach learns a memory component to summarize system utterances into a short span of words. To further promote a compact action representation, we propose an auxiliary task that restores state annotations as the summarized dialogue context using the memory component. Our proposed approach outperforms latent action baselines on MultiWOZ, a benchmark multi-domain dataset.


Few-Shot Generalization Across Dialogue Tasks

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Machine-learning based dialogue managers are able to learn complex behaviors in order to complete a task, but it is not straightforward to extend their capabilities to new domains. We investigate different policies' ability to handle uncooperative user behavior, and how well expertise in completing one task (such as restaurant reservations) can be reapplied when learning a new one (e.g. booking a hotel). We introduce the Recurrent Embedding Dialogue Policy (REDP), which embeds system actions and dialogue states in the same vector space. REDP contains a memory component and attention mechanism based on a modified Neural Turing Machine, and significantly outperforms a baseline LSTM classifier on this task. We also show that both our architecture and baseline solve the bAbI dialogue task, achieving 100% test accuracy.


MALA: Cross-Domain Dialogue Generation with Action Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Response generation for task-oriented dialogues involves two basic components: dialogue planning and surface realization. These two components, however, have a discrepancy in their objectives, i.e., task completion and language quality. To deal with such discrepancy, conditioned response generation has been introduced where the generation process is factorized into action decision and language generation via explicit action representations. To obtain action representations, recent studies learn latent actions in an unsupervised manner based on the utterance lexical similarity. Such an action learning approach is prone to diversities of language surfaces, which may impinge task completion and language quality. To address this issue, we propose multi-stage adaptive latent action learning (MALA) that learns semantic latent actions by distinguishing the effects of utterances on dialogue progress. We model the utterance effect using the transition of dialogue states caused by the utterance and develop a semantic similarity measurement that estimates whether utterances have similar effects. For learning semantic actions on domains without dialogue states, MsALA extends the semantic similarity measurement across domains progressively, i.e., from aligning shared actions to learning domain-specific actions. Experiments using multi-domain datasets, SMD and MultiWOZ, show that our proposed model achieves consistent improvements over the baselines models in terms of both task completion and language quality.