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Toward Estimating Others' Transition Models Under Occlusion for Multi-Robot IRL

AAAI Conferences

Multi-robot inverse reinforcement learning (mIRL) is broadly useful for learning, from observations, the behaviors of multiple robots executing fixed trajectories and interacting with each other. In this paper, we relax a crucial assumption in IRL to make it better suited for wider robotic applications: we allow the transition functions of other robots to be stochastic and do not assume that the transition error probabilities are known to the learner. Challenged by occlusion where large portions of others' state spaces are fully hidden, we present a new approach that maps stochastic transitions to distributions over features. Then, the underconstrained problem is solved using nonlinear optimization that maximizes entropy to learn the transition function of each robot from occluded observations. Our methods represent significant and first steps toward making mIRL pragmatic.


A Framework and Method for Online Inverse Reinforcement Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Inverse reinforcement learning (IRL) is the problem of learning the preferences of an agent from the observations of its behavior on a task. While this problem has been well investigated, the related problem of {\em online} IRL---where the observations are incrementally accrued, yet the demands of the application often prohibit a full rerun of an IRL method---has received relatively less attention. We introduce the first formal framework for online IRL, called incremental IRL (I2RL), and a new method that advances maximum entropy IRL with hidden variables, to this setting. Our formal analysis shows that the new method has a monotonically improving performance with more demonstration data, as well as probabilistically bounded error, both under full and partial observability. Experiments in a simulated robotic application of penetrating a continuous patrol under occlusion shows the relatively improved performance and speed up of the new method and validates the utility of online IRL.


Lifelong Inverse Reinforcement Learning

Neural Information Processing Systems

Methods for learning from demonstration (LfD) have shown success in acquiring behavior policies by imitating a user. However, even for a single task, LfD may require numerous demonstrations. For versatile agents that must learn many tasks via demonstration, this process would substantially burden the user if each task were learned in isolation. To address this challenge, we introduce the novel problem of lifelong learning from demonstration, which allows the agent to continually build upon knowledge learned from previously demonstrated tasks to accelerate the learning of new tasks, reducing the amount of demonstrations required. As one solution to this problem, we propose the first lifelong learning approach to inverse reinforcement learning, which learns consecutive tasks via demonstration, continually transferring knowledge between tasks to improve performance.


Driving with Style: Inverse Reinforcement Learning in General-Purpose Planning for Automated Driving

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Behavior and motion planning play an important role in automated driving. Traditionally, behavior planners instruct local motion planners with predefined behaviors. Due to the high scene complexity in urban environments, unpredictable situations may occur in which behavior planners fail to match predefined behavior templates. Recently, general-purpose planners have been introduced, combining behavior and local motion planning. These general-purpose planners allow behavior-aware motion planning given a single reward function. However, two challenges arise: First, this function has to map a complex feature space into rewards. Second, the reward function has to be manually tuned by an expert. Manually tuning this reward function becomes a tedious task. In this paper, we propose an approach that relies on human driving demonstrations to automatically tune reward functions. This study offers important insights into the driving style optimization of general-purpose planners with maximum entropy inverse reinforcement learning. We evaluate our approach based on the expected value difference between learned and demonstrated policies. Furthermore, we compare the similarity of human driven trajectories with optimal policies of our planner under learned and expert-tuned reward functions. Our experiments show that we are able to learn reward functions exceeding the level of manual expert tuning without prior domain knowledge.


Lifelong Inverse Reinforcement Learning

Neural Information Processing Systems

Methods for learning from demonstration (LfD) have shown success in acquiring behavior policies by imitating a user. However, even for a single task, LfD may require numerous demonstrations. For versatile agents that must learn many tasks via demonstration, this process would substantially burden the user if each task were learned in isolation. To address this challenge, we introduce the novel problem of lifelong learning from demonstration, which allows the agent to continually build upon knowledge learned from previously demonstrated tasks to accelerate the learning of new tasks, reducing the amount of demonstrations required. As one solution to this problem, we propose the first lifelong learning approach to inverse reinforcement learning, which learns consecutive tasks via demonstration, continually transferring knowledge between tasks to improve performance.