Goto

Collaborating Authors

Improving Sepsis Treatment Strategies by Combining Deep and Kernel-Based Reinforcement Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Sepsis is the leading cause of mortality in the ICU. It is challenging to manage because individual patients respond differently to treatment. Thus, tailoring treatment to the individual patient is essential for the best outcomes. In this paper, we take steps toward this goal by applying a mixture-of-experts framework to personalize sepsis treatment. The mixture model selectively alternates between neighbor-based (kernel) and deep reinforcement learning (DRL) experts depending on patient's current history. On a large retrospective cohort, this mixture-based approach outperforms physician, kernel only, and DRL-only experts.


Model-Based Reinforcement Learning for Sepsis Treatment

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Sepsis is a dangerous condition that is a leading cause of patient mortality. Treating sepsis is highly challenging, because individual patients respond very differently to medical interventions and there is no universally agreed-upon treatment for sepsis. In this work, we explore the use of continuous state-space model-based reinforcement learning (RL) to discover high-quality treatment policies for sepsis patients. Our quantitative evaluation reveals that by blending the treatment strategy discovered with RL with what clinicians follow, we can obtain improved policies, potentially allowing for better medical treatment for sepsis.


Does the "Artificial Intelligence Clinician" learn optimal treatment strategies for sepsis in intensive care?

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

From 2017 to 2018 the number of scientific publications found via PubMed search using the keyword "Machine Learning" increased by 46% (4,317 to 6,307). The results of studies involving machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), and big data have captured the attention of healthcare practitioners, healthcare managers, and the public at a time when Western medicine grapples with unmitigated cost increases and public demands for accountability. The complexity involved in healthcare applications of machine learning and the size of the associated data sets has afforded many researchers an uncontested opportunity to satisfy these demands with relatively little oversight. In a recent Nature Medicine article, "The Artificial Intelligence Clinician learns optimal treatment strategies for sepsis in intensive care," Komorowski and his coauthors propose methods to train an artificial intelligence clinician to treat sepsis patients with vasopressors and IV fluids. In this post, we will closely examine the claims laid out in this paper. In particular, we will study the individual treatment profiles suggested by their AI Clinician to gain insight into how their AI Clinician intends to treat patients on an individual level.


Understanding the Artificial Intelligence Clinician and optimal treatment strategies for sepsis in intensive care

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this document, we explore in more detail our published work (Komorowski, Celi, Badawi, Gordon, & Faisal, 2018) for the benefit of the AI in Healthcare research community. In the above paper, we developed the AI Clinician system, which demonstrated how reinforcement learning could be used to make useful recommendations towards optimal treatment decisions from intensive care data. Since publication a number of authors have reviewed our work (e.g. Given the difference of our framework to previous work, the fact that we are bridging two very different academic communities (intensive care and machine learning) and that our work has impact on a number of other areas with more traditional computer-based approaches (biosignal processing and control, biomedical engineering), we are providing here additional details on our recent publication. We acknowledge the online comments by Jeter et al (https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.03271). The sections of the present document are structured so as to address some of their questions. For clarity, we label figures from our main Nature Medicine publication as "M", figures from Jeter et al.'s arXiv paper as "J" and figures from our response here as "R". Jeter et al. state "the only possible response we can afford is a more aggressive and open dialogue".


Identifying Distinct, Effective Treatments for Acute Hypotension with SODA-RL: Safely Optimized Diverse Accurate Reinforcement Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Hypotension in critical care settings is a life-threatening emergency that must be recognized and treated early. While fluid bolus therapy and vasopressors are common treatments, it is often unclear which interventions to give, in what amounts, and for how long. Observational data in the form of electronic health records can provide a source for helping inform these choices from past events, but often it is not possible to identify a single best strategy from observational data alone. In such situations, we argue it is important to expose the collection of plausible options to a provider. To this end, we develop SODA-RL: Safely Optimized, Diverse, and Accurate Reinforcement Learning, to identify distinct treatment options that are supported in the data. We demonstrate SODA-RL on a cohort of 10,142 ICU stays where hypotension presented. Our learned policies perform comparably to the observed physician behaviors, while providing different, plausible alternatives for treatment decisions.