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Encoding Musical Style with Transformer Autoencoders

arXiv.org Machine Learning

A BSTRACT We consider the problem of learning high-level controls over the global structure of sequence generation, particularly in the context of symbolic music generation with complex language models. In this work, we present the Transformer au-toencoder, which aggregates encodings of the input data across time to obtain a global representation of style from a given performance. We show it is possible to combine this global embedding with other temporally distributed embeddings, enabling improved control over the separate aspects of performance style and and melody. Empirically, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on a variety of music generation tasks on the MAESTRO dataset and a Y ouTube dataset with 10,000 hours of piano performances, where we achieve improvements in terms of log-likelihood and mean listening scores as compared to relevant baselines. As the number of generative applications increase, it becomes increasingly important to consider how users can interact with such systems, particularly when the generative model functions as a tool in their creative process (Engel et al., 2017a; Gillick et al., 2019) To this end, we consider how one can learn high-level controls over the global structure of a generated sample. We focus on symbolic music generation, where Music Transformer (Huang et al., 2019b) is the current state-of-the-art in generating high-quality samples that span over a minute in length. The challenge in controllable sequence generation is that Transformers (V aswani et al., 2017) and their variants excel as language models or in sequence-to-sequence tasks such as translation, but it is less clear as to how they can: (1) learn and (2) incorporate global conditioning information at inference time.


A Hierarchical Latent Vector Model for Learning Long-Term Structure in Music

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The Variational Autoencoder (VAE) has proven to be an effective model for producing semantically meaningful latent representations for natural data. However, it has thus far seen limited application to sequential data, and, as we demonstrate, existing recurrent VAE models have difficulty modeling sequences with long-term structure. To address this issue, we propose the use of a hierarchical decoder, which first outputs embeddings for subsequences of the input and then uses these embeddings to generate each subsequence independently. This structure encourages the model to utilize its latent code, thereby avoiding the "posterior collapse" problem which remains an issue for recurrent VAEs. We apply this architecture to modeling sequences of musical notes and find that it exhibits dramatically better sampling, interpolation, and reconstruction performance than a "flat" baseline model. An implementation of our "MusicVAE" is available online at http://g.co/magenta/musicvae-colab.


Jukebox: A Generative Model for Music

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We introduce Jukebox, a model that generates music with singing in the raw audio domain. We tackle the long context of raw audio using a multi-scale VQ-VAE to compress it to discrete codes, and modeling those using autoregressive Transformers. We show that the combined model at scale can generate high-fidelity and diverse songs with coherence up to multiple minutes. We can condition on artist and genre to steer the musical and vocal style, and on unaligned lyrics to make the singing more controllable. We are releasing thousands of non cherry-picked samples at https://jukebox.openai.com, along with model weights and code at https://github.com/openai/jukebox


Learning a Latent Space of Multitrack Measures

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Discovering and exploring the underlying structure of multi-instrumental music using learning-based approaches remains an open problem. We extend the recent MusicVAE model to represent multitrack polyphonic measures as vectors in a latent space. Our approach enables several useful operations such as generating plausible measures from scratch, interpolating between measures in a musically meaningful way, and manipulating specific musical attributes. We also introduce chord conditioning, which allows all of these operations to be performed while keeping harmony fixed, and allows chords to be changed while maintaining musical "style". By generating a sequence of measures over a predefined chord progression, our model can produce music with convincing long-term structure. We demonstrate that our latent space model makes it possible to intuitively control and generate musical sequences with rich instrumentation (see https://goo.gl/s2N7dV for generated audio).


WaveGrad: Estimating Gradients for Waveform Generation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This paper introduces WaveGrad, a conditional model for waveform generation which estimates gradients of the data density. The model is built on prior work on score matching and diffusion probabilistic models. It starts from a Gaussian white noise signal and iteratively refines the signal via a gradient-based sampler conditioned on the mel-spectrogram. WaveGrad offers a natural way to trade inference speed for sample quality by adjusting the number of refinement steps, and bridges the gap between non-autoregressive and autoregressive models in terms of audio quality. We find that it can generate high fidelity audio samples using as few as six iterations. Experiments reveal WaveGrad to generate high fidelity audio, outperforming adversarial non-autoregressive baselines and matching a strong likelihood-based autoregressive baseline using fewer sequential operations. Deep generative models have revolutionized speech synthesis (Oord et al., 2016; Sotelo et al., 2017; Wang et al., 2017; Biadsy et al., 2019; Jia et al., 2019; Vasquez & Lewis, 2019). Autoregressive models, in particular, have been popular for raw audio generation thanks to their tractable likelihoods, simple inference procedures, and high fidelity samples (Oord et al., 2016; Mehri et al., 2017; Kalchbrenner et al., 2018; Song et al., 2019; Valin & Skoglund, 2019). However, autoregressive models require a large number of sequential computations to generate an audio sample.