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Transformers in Vision: A Survey

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Astounding results from transformer models on natural language tasks have intrigued the vision community to study their application to computer vision problems. This has led to exciting progress on a number of tasks while requiring minimal inductive biases in the model design. This survey aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the transformer models in the computer vision discipline and assumes little to no prior background in the field. We start with an introduction to fundamental concepts behind the success of transformer models i.e., self-supervision and self-attention. Transformer architectures leverage self-attention mechanisms to encode long-range dependencies in the input domain which makes them highly expressive. Since they assume minimal prior knowledge about the structure of the problem, self-supervision using pretext tasks is applied to pre-train transformer models on large-scale (unlabelled) datasets. The learned representations are then fine-tuned on the downstream tasks, typically leading to excellent performance due to the generalization and expressivity of encoded features. We cover extensive applications of transformers in vision including popular recognition tasks (e.g., image classification, object detection, action recognition, and segmentation), generative modeling, multi-modal tasks (e.g., visual-question answering and visual reasoning), video processing (e.g., activity recognition, video forecasting), low-level vision (e.g., image super-resolution and colorization) and 3D analysis (e.g., point cloud classification and segmentation). We compare the respective advantages and limitations of popular techniques both in terms of architectural design and their experimental value. Finally, we provide an analysis on open research directions and possible future works.


Toward Transformer-Based Object Detection

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Transformers have become the dominant model in natural language processing, owing to their ability to pretrain on massive amounts of data, then transfer to smaller, more specific tasks via fine-tuning. The Vision Transformer was the first major attempt to apply a pure transformer model directly to images as input, demonstrating that as compared to convolutional networks, transformer-based architectures can achieve competitive results on benchmark classification tasks. However, the computational complexity of the attention operator means that we are limited to low-resolution inputs. For more complex tasks such as detection or segmentation, maintaining a high input resolution is crucial to ensure that models can properly identify and reflect fine details in their output. This naturally raises the question of whether or not transformer-based architectures such as the Vision Transformer are capable of performing tasks other than classification. In this paper, we determine that Vision Transformers can be used as a backbone by a common detection task head to produce competitive COCO results. The model that we propose, ViT-FRCNN, demonstrates several known properties associated with transformers, including large pretraining capacity and fast fine-tuning performance. We also investigate improvements over a standard detection backbone, including superior performance on out-of-domain images, better performance on large objects, and a lessened reliance on non-maximum suppression. We view ViT-FRCNN as an important stepping stone toward a pure-transformer solution of complex vision tasks such as object detection.


CAT: Cross Attention in Vision Transformer

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Since Transformer has found widespread use in NLP, the potential of Transformer in CV has been realized and has inspired many new approaches. However, the computation required for replacing word tokens with image patches for Transformer after the tokenization of the image is vast(e.g., ViT), which bottlenecks model training and inference. In this paper, we propose a new attention mechanism in Transformer termed Cross Attention, which alternates attention inner the image patch instead of the whole image to capture local information and apply attention between image patches which are divided from single-channel feature maps to capture global information. Both operations have less computation than standard self-attention in Transformer. By alternately applying attention inner patch and between patches, we implement cross attention to maintain the performance with lower computational cost and build a hierarchical network called Cross Attention Transformer(CAT) for other vision tasks. Our base model achieves state-of-the-arts on ImageNet-1K, and improves the performance of other methods on COCO and ADE20K, illustrating that our network has the potential to serve as general backbones.


Segmenter: Transformer for Semantic Segmentation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Image segmentation is often ambiguous at the level of individual image patches and requires contextual information to reach label consensus. In this paper we introduce Segmenter, a transformer model for semantic segmentation. In contrast to convolution based approaches, our approach allows to model global context already at the first layer and throughout the network. We build on the recent Vision Transformer (ViT) and extend it to semantic segmentation. To do so, we rely on the output embeddings corresponding to image patches and obtain class labels from these embeddings with a point-wise linear decoder or a mask transformer decoder. We leverage models pre-trained for image classification and show that we can fine-tune them on moderate sized datasets available for semantic segmentation. The linear decoder allows to obtain excellent results already, but the performance can be further improved by a mask transformer generating class masks. We conduct an extensive ablation study to show the impact of the different parameters, in particular the performance is better for large models and small patch sizes. Segmenter attains excellent results for semantic segmentation. It outperforms the state of the art on the challenging ADE20K dataset and performs on-par on Pascal Context and Cityscapes.


Transformer in Transformer

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Transformer is a type of self-attention-based neural networks originally applied for NLP tasks. Recently, pure transformer-based models are proposed to solve computer vision problems. These visual transformers usually view an image as a sequence of patches while they ignore the intrinsic structure information inside each patch. In this paper, we propose a novel Transformer-iN-Transformer (TNT) model for modeling both patch-level and pixel-level representation. In each TNT block, an outer transformer block is utilized to process patch embeddings, and an inner transformer block extracts local features from pixel embeddings. The pixel-level feature is projected to the space of patch embedding by a linear transformation layer and then added into the patch. By stacking the TNT blocks, we build the TNT model for image recognition. Experiments on ImageNet benchmark and downstream tasks demonstrate the superiority and efficiency of the proposed TNT architecture. For example, our TNT achieves $81.3\%$ top-1 accuracy on ImageNet which is $1.5\%$ higher than that of DeiT with similar computational cost. The code will be available at https://github.com/huawei-noah/noah-research/tree/master/TNT.