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Search-Guided, Lightly-supervised Training of Structured Prediction Energy Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In structured output prediction tasks, labeling ground-truth training output is often expensive. However, for many tasks, even when the true output is unknown, we can evaluate predictions using a scalar reward function, which may be easily assembled from human knowledge or non-differentiable pipelines. But searching through the entire output space to find the best output with respect to this reward function is typically intractable. In this paper, we instead use efficient truncated randomized search in this reward function to train structured prediction energy networks (SPENs), which provide efficient test-time inference using gradient-based search on a smooth, learned representation of the score landscape, and have previously yielded state-of-the-art results in structured prediction. In particular, this truncated randomized search in the reward function yields previously unknown local improvements, providing effective supervision to SPENs, avoiding their traditional need for labeled training data.


A Neural Probabilistic Structured-Prediction Method for Transition-Based Natural Language Processing

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

We propose a neural probabilistic structured-prediction method for transition-based natural language processing, which integrates beam search and contrastive learning. The method uses a global optimization model, which can leverage arbitrary features over non-local context. Beam search is used for efficient heuristic decoding, and contrastive learning is performed for adjusting the model according to search errors. When evaluated on both chunking and dependency parsing tasks, the proposed method achieves significant accuracy improvements over the locally normalized greedy baseline on the two tasks, respectively.


End-to-End Learning for Structured Prediction Energy Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Structured Prediction Energy Networks (SPENs) are a simple, yet expressive family of structured prediction models (Belanger and McCallum, 2016). An energy function over candidate structured outputs is given by a deep network, and predictions are formed by gradient-based optimization. This paper presents end-to-end learning for SPENs, where the energy function is discriminatively trained by back-propagating through gradient-based prediction. In our experience, the approach is substantially more accurate than the structured SVM method of Belanger and McCallum (2016), as it allows us to use more sophisticated non-convex energies. We provide a collection of techniques for improving the speed, accuracy, and memory requirements of end-to-end SPENs, and demonstrate the power of our method on 7-Scenes image denoising and CoNLL-2005 semantic role labeling tasks. In both, inexact minimization of non-convex SPEN energies is superior to baseline methods that use simplistic energy functions that can be minimized exactly.


Structured Prediction Energy Networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We introduce structured prediction energy networks (SPENs), a flexible framework for structured prediction. A deep architecture is used to define an energy function of candidate labels, and then predictions are produced by using back-propagation to iteratively optimize the energy with respect to the labels. This deep architecture captures dependencies between labels that would lead to intractable graphical models, and performs structure learning by automatically learning discriminative features of the structured output. One natural application of our technique is multi-label classification, which traditionally has required strict prior assumptions about the interactions between labels to ensure tractable learning and prediction. We are able to apply SPENs to multi-label problems with substantially larger label sets than previous applications of structured prediction, while modeling high-order interactions using minimal structural assumptions. Overall, deep learning provides remarkable tools for learning features of the inputs to a prediction problem, and this work extends these techniques to learning features of structured outputs. Our experiments provide impressive performance on a variety of benchmark multi-label classification tasks, demonstrate that our technique can be used to provide interpretable structure learning, and illuminate fundamental trade-offs between feed-forward and iterative structured prediction.


Learning Approximate Inference Networks for Structured Prediction

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Structured prediction energy networks (SPENs; Belanger & McCallum 2016) use neural network architectures to define energy functions that can capture arbitrary dependencies among parts of structured outputs. Prior work used gradient descent for inference, relaxing the structured output to a set of continuous variables and then optimizing the energy with respect to them. We replace this use of gradient descent with a neural network trained to approximate structured argmax inference. This "inference network" outputs continuous values that we treat as the output structure. We develop large-margin training criteria for joint training of the structured energy function and inference network. On multi-label classification we report speed-ups of 10-60x compared to (Belanger et al, 2017) while also improving accuracy. For sequence labeling with simple structured energies, our approach performs comparably to exact inference while being much faster at test time. We then demonstrate improved accuracy by augmenting the energy with a "label language model" that scores entire output label sequences, showing it can improve handling of long-distance dependencies in part-of-speech tagging. Finally, we show how inference networks can replace dynamic programming for test-time inference in conditional random fields, suggestive for their general use for fast inference in structured settings.