Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON, DC (March 8, 2017)--Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting. The researchers used cutting-edge artificial intelligence to create a "chatbot" interventional radiologist that can automatically communicate with referring clinicians and quickly provide evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions. This allows the referring physician to provide real-time information to the patient about the next phase of treatment, or basic information about an interventional radiology treatment. "We theorized that artificial intelligence could be used in a low-cost, automated way in interventional radiology as a way to improve patient care," said Edward W. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and one of the authors of the study. "Because artificial intelligence has already begun transforming many industries, it has great potential to also transform health care."


Getting Started with Machine Learning: 3 Things Marketers Need to Know

#artificialintelligence

The buzz surrounding machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) in the consumer world has rapidly bled over into the enterprise. Much of this hype stems from the new consumer trends that hint at the possibilities of AI, such as self-driving cars and intelligent voice-first products like Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri. At the same time, mainstream cloud adoption and ever-increasing computing power in the form of new solutions like Google Spanner are accelerating the development, accuracy and speed of AI's underlying foundations, from data availability and spam detection, to machine learning, predictive analytics and natural language processing. So it should come as no surprise that sales and marketing leaders are questioning what all this means for their departments and companies. At a basic level, AI is about replacing human function with computers.


Experts warns Google's Go win proves AI can be unpredictable

AITopics Original Links

Humans have been taking a beating from computers lately. The 4-1 defeat of Go grandmaster Lee Se-Dol by Google's AlphaGo artificial intelligence (AI) is only the latest in a string of pursuits in which technology has triumphed over humanity. Self-driving cars are already less accident-prone than human drivers, the TV quiz show Jeopardy! is a lost cause, and in chess humans have fallen so woefully behind computers that a recent international tournament was won by a mobile phone. Researchers from Western Sydney University two reasons why AIs are'our greatest threat. The first being they are trained with logic and heuristics.


bartMachine: Machine Learning with Bayesian Additive Regression Trees

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We present a new package in R implementing Bayesian additive regression trees (BART). The package introduces many new features for data analysis using BART such as variable selection, interaction detection, model diagnostic plots, incorporation of missing data and the ability to save trees for future prediction. It is significantly faster than the current R implementation, parallelized, and capable of handling both large sample sizes and high-dimensional data.


Vision-based Navigation of Autonomous Vehicle in Roadway Environments with Unexpected Hazards

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

ABSTRACT Vision-based navigation of modern autonomous vehicles primarily depends on Deep Neural Network (DNN) based systems in which the controller obtains input from sensors/detectors such as cameras, and produces an output such as a steering wheel angle to navigate the vehicle safely in roadway traffic. Typically, these DNN-based systems are trained through supervised and/or transfer learning; however, recent studies show that these systems can be compromised by perturbation or adversarial input features on the trained DNN-based models. Similarly, this perturbation can be introduced into the autonomous vehicle DNN-based system by roadway hazards such as debris and roadblocks. In this study, we first introduce a roadway hazardous environment (both intentional and unintentional) that can compromise the DNN-based system of an autonomous vehicle, producing an incorrect vehicle navigational output such as a steering wheel angle, which can cause crashes resulting in fatality and injury. Then, we develop an approach based on object detection and semantic segmentation to mitigate the adverse effect of this hazardous environment, one that helps the autonomous vehicle to navigate safely around such hazards. This study finds the DNN-based model with hazardous object detection, and semantic segmentation improves the ability of an autonomous vehicle to avoid potential crashes by 21% compared to the traditional DNN-based autonomous driving system.