Goto

Collaborating Authors

Learning Latent Tree Graphical Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We study the problem of learning a latent tree graphical model where samples are available only from a subset of variables. We propose two consistent and computationally efficient algorithms for learning minimal latent trees, that is, trees without any redundant hidden nodes. Unlike many existing methods, the observed nodes (or variables) are not constrained to be leaf nodes. Our first algorithm, recursive grouping, builds the latent tree recursively by identifying sibling groups using so-called information distances. One of the main contributions of this work is our second algorithm, which we refer to as CLGrouping. CLGrouping starts with a pre-processing procedure in which a tree over the observed variables is constructed. This global step groups the observed nodes that are likely to be close to each other in the true latent tree, thereby guiding subsequent recursive grouping (or equivalent procedures) on much smaller subsets of variables. This results in more accurate and efficient learning of latent trees. We also present regularized versions of our algorithms that learn latent tree approximations of arbitrary distributions. We compare the proposed algorithms to other methods by performing extensive numerical experiments on various latent tree graphical models such as hidden Markov models and star graphs. In addition, we demonstrate the applicability of our methods on real-world datasets by modeling the dependency structure of monthly stock returns in the S&P index and of the words in the 20 newsgroups dataset.


Learning loopy graphical models with latent variables: Efficient methods and guarantees

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The problem of structure estimation in graphical models with latent variables is considered. We characterize conditions for tractable graph estimation and develop efficient methods with provable guarantees. We consider models where the underlying Markov graph is locally tree-like, and the model is in the regime of correlation decay. For the special case of the Ising model, the number of samples $n$ required for structural consistency of our method scales as $n=\Omega(\theta_{\min}^{-\delta\eta(\eta+1)-2}\log p)$, where p is the number of variables, $\theta_{\min}$ is the minimum edge potential, $\delta$ is the depth (i.e., distance from a hidden node to the nearest observed nodes), and $\eta$ is a parameter which depends on the bounds on node and edge potentials in the Ising model. Necessary conditions for structural consistency under any algorithm are derived and our method nearly matches the lower bound on sample requirements. Further, the proposed method is practical to implement and provides flexibility to control the number of latent variables and the cycle lengths in the output graph.


Spectral Methods for Learning Multivariate Latent Tree Structure

Neural Information Processing Systems

This work considers the problem of learning the structure of multivariate linear tree models, which include a variety of directed tree graphical models with continuous, discrete, and mixed latent variables such as linear-Gaussian models, hidden Markov models, Gaussian mixture models, and Markov evolutionary trees. The setting is one where we only have samples from certain observed variables in the tree, and our goal is to estimate the tree structure (i.e., the graph of how the underlying hidden variables are connected to each other and to the observed variables). We propose the Spectral Recursive Grouping algorithm, an efficient and simple bottom-up procedure for recovering the tree structure from independent samples of the observed variables. Our finite sample size bounds for exact recovery of the tree structure reveal certain natural dependencies on underlying statistical and structural properties of the underlying joint distribution. Furthermore, our sample complexity guarantees have no explicit dependence on the dimensionality of the observed variables, making the algorithm applicable to many high-dimensional settings. At the heart of our algorithm is a spectral quartet test for determining the relative topology of a quartet of variables from second-order statistics.


Latent Graphical Model Selection: Efficient Methods for Locally Tree-like Graphs

Neural Information Processing Systems

Graphical model selection refers to the problem of estimating the unknown graph structure given observations at the nodes in the model. We consider a challenging instance of this problem when some of the nodes are latent or hidden. We characterize conditions for tractable graph estimation and develop efficient methods with provable guarantees. We consider the class of Ising models Markov on locally tree-like graphs, which are in the regime of correlation decay. We propose an efficient method for graph estimation, and establish its structural consistency when the number of samples $n$ scales as $n = \Omega(\theta_{\min}^{-\delta \eta(\eta+1)-2}\log p)$, where $\theta_{\min}$ is the minimum edge potential, $\delta$ is the depth (i.e., distance from a hidden node to the nearest observed nodes), and $\eta$ is a parameter which depends on the minimum and maximum node and edge potentials in the Ising model. The proposed method is practical to implement and provides flexibility to control the number of latent variables and the cycle lengths in the output graph. We also present necessary conditions for graph estimation by any method and show that our method nearly matches the lower bound on sample requirements.


Kernel Embeddings of Latent Tree Graphical Models

Neural Information Processing Systems

Latent tree graphical models are natural tools for expressing long range and hierarchical dependencies among many variables which are common in computer vision, bioinformatics and natural language processing problems. However, existing models are largely restricted to discrete and Gaussian variables due to computational constraints; furthermore, algorithms for estimating the latent tree structure and learning the model parameters are largely restricted to heuristic local search. We present a method based on kernel embeddings of distributions for latent tree graphical models with continuous and non-Gaussian variables. Our method can recover the latent tree structures with provable guarantees and perform local-minimum free parameter learning and efficient inference. Experiments on simulated and real data show the advantage of our proposed approach.