Towards automated feature engineering for credit card fraud detection using multi-perspective HMMs

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine learning and data mining techniques have been used extensively in order to detect credit card frauds. However, most studies consider credit card transactions as isolated events and not as a sequence of transactions. In this framework, we model a sequence of credit card transactions from three different perspectives, namely (i) The sequence contains or doesn't contain a fraud (ii) The sequence is obtained by fixing the card-holder or the payment terminal (iii) It is a sequence of spent amount or of elapsed time between the current and previous transactions. Combinations of the three binary perspectives give eight sets of sequences from the (training) set of transactions. Each one of these sequences is modelled with a Hidden Markov Model (HMM). Each HMM associates a likelihood to a transaction given its sequence of previous transactions. These likelihoods are used as additional features in a Random Forest classifier for fraud detection. Our multiple perspectives HMM-based approach offers automated feature engineering to model temporal correlations so as to improve the effectiveness of the classification task and allows for an increase in the detection of fraudulent transactions when combined with the state of the art expert based feature engineering strategy for credit card fraud detection. In extension to previous works, we show that this approach goes beyond ecommerce transactions and provides a robust feature engineering over different datasets, hyperparameters and classifiers. Moreover, we compare strategies to deal with structural missing values.


Dataset shift quantification for credit card fraud detection

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Machine learning and data mining techniques have been used extensively in order to detect credit card frauds. However purchase behaviour and fraudster strategies may change over time. This phenomenon is named dataset shift or concept drift in the domain of fraud detection. In this paper, we present a method to quantify day-by-day the dataset shift in our face-to-face credit card transactions dataset (card holder located in the shop) . In practice, we classify the days against each other and measure the efficiency of the classification. The more efficient the classification, the more different the buying behaviour between two days, and vice versa. Therefore, we obtain a distance matrix characterizing the dataset shift. After an agglomerative clustering of the distance matrix, we observe that the dataset shift pattern matches the calendar events for this time period (holidays, week-ends, etc). We then incorporate this dataset shift knowledge in the credit card fraud detection task as a new feature. This leads to a small improvement of the detection.


Streaming Active Learning Strategies for Real-Life Credit Card Fraud Detection: Assessment and Visualization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Credit card fraud detection is a very challenging problem because of the specific nature of transaction data and the labeling process. The transaction data is peculiar because they are obtained in a streaming fashion, they are strongly imbalanced and prone to non-stationarity. The labeling is the outcome of an active learning process, as every day human investigators contact only a small number of cardholders (associated to the riskiest transactions) and obtain the class (fraud or genuine) of the related transactions. An adequate selection of the set of cardholders is therefore crucial for an efficient fraud detection process. In this paper, we present a number of active learning strategies and we investigate their fraud detection accuracies. We compare different criteria (supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised) to query unlabeled transactions. Finally, we highlight the existence of an exploitation/exploration trade-off for active learning in the context of fraud detection, which has so far been overlooked in the literature.


TitAnt: Online Real-time Transaction Fraud Detection in Ant Financial

arXiv.org Machine Learning

With the explosive growth of e-commerce and the booming of e-payment, detecting online transaction fraud in real time has become increasingly important to Fintech business. To tackle this problem, we introduce the TitAnt, a transaction fraud detection system deployed in Ant Financial, one of the largest Fintech companies in the world. The system is able to predict online real-time transaction fraud in mere milliseconds. We present the problem definition, feature extraction, detection methods, implementation and deployment of the system, as well as empirical effectiveness. Extensive experiments have been conducted on large real-world transaction data to show the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed system.


Data Science with Python: Exploratory Analysis with Movie-Ratings and Fraud Detection with Credit-Card Transactions

@machinelearnbot

The following problems are taken from the projects / assignments in the edX course Python for Data Science (UCSanDiagoX) and the coursera course Applied Machine Learning in Python (UMich).