A comparison of recent waveform generation and acoustic modeling methods for neural-network-based speech synthesis

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recent advances in speech synthesis suggest that limitations such as the lossy nature of the amplitude spectrum with minimum phase approximation and the over-smoothing effect in acoustic modeling can be overcome by using advanced machine learning approaches. In this paper, we build a framework in which we can fairly compare new vocoding and acoustic modeling techniques with conventional approaches by means of a large scale crowdsourced evaluation. Results on acoustic models showed that generative adversarial networks and an autoregressive (AR) model performed better than a normal recurrent network and the AR model performed best. Evaluation on vocoders by using the same AR acoustic model demonstrated that a Wavenet vocoder outperformed classical source-filter-based vocoders. Particularly, generated speech waveforms from the combination of AR acoustic model and Wavenet vocoder achieved a similar score of speech quality to vocoded speech.


Wasserstein GAN and Waveform Loss-based Acoustic Model Training for Multi-speaker Text-to-Speech Synthesis Systems Using a WaveNet Vocoder

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Recent neural networks such as WaveNet and sampleRNN that learn directly from speech waveform samples have achieved very high-quality synthetic speech in terms of both naturalness and speaker similarity even in multi-speaker text-to-speech synthesis systems. Such neural networks are being used as an alternative to vocoders and hence they are often called neural vocoders. The neural vocoder uses acoustic features as local condition parameters, and these parameters need to be accurately predicted by another acoustic model. However, it is not yet clear how to train this acoustic model, which is problematic because the final quality of synthetic speech is significantly affected by the performance of the acoustic model. Significant degradation happens, especially when predicted acoustic features have mismatched characteristics compared to natural ones. In order to reduce the mismatched characteristics between natural and generated acoustic features, we propose frameworks that incorporate either a conditional generative adversarial network (GAN) or its variant, Wasserstein GAN with gradient penalty (WGAN-GP), into multi-speaker speech synthesis that uses the WaveNet vocoder. We also extend the GAN frameworks and use the discretized mixture logistic loss of a well-trained WaveNet in addition to mean squared error and adversarial losses as parts of objective functions. Experimental results show that acoustic models trained using the WGAN-GP framework using back-propagated discretized-mixture-of-logistics (DML) loss achieves the highest subjective evaluation scores in terms of both quality and speaker similarity.


Speaker Anonymization Using X-vector and Neural Waveform Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The social media revolution has produced a plethora of web services to which users can easily upload and share multimedia documents. Despite the popularity and convenience of such services, the sharing of such inherently personal data, including speech data, raises obvious security and privacy concerns. In particular, a user's speech data may be acquired and used with speech synthesis systems to produce high-quality speech utterances which reflect the same user's speaker identity. These utterances may then be used to attack speaker verification systems. One solution to mitigate these concerns involves the concealing of speaker identities before the sharing of speech data. For this purpose, we present a new approach to speaker anonymization. The idea is to extract linguistic and speaker identity features from an utterance and then to use these with neural acoustic and waveform models to synthesize anonymized speech. The original speaker identity, in the form of timbre, is suppressed and replaced with that of an anonymous pseudo identity. The approach exploits state-of-the-art x-vector speaker representations. These are used to derive anonymized pseudo speaker identities through the combination of multiple, random speaker x-vectors. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective in concealing speaker identities. It increases the equal error rate of a speaker verification system while maintaining high quality, anonymized speech.


Combining Visual and Acoustic Speech Signals with a Neural Network Improves Intelligibility

Neural Information Processing Systems

Previous attempts at using these visual speech signals to improve automatic speech recognition systems havecombined the acoustic and visual speech information at a symbolic level using heuristic rules. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative approach to fusing the visual and acoustic speech information by training feedforward neural networks to map the visual signal onto the corresponding short-term spectral amplitude envelope (STSAE) of the acoustic signal. This information can be directly combined with the degraded acoustic STSAE. Significant improvementsare demonstrated in vowel recognition from noise-degraded acoustic signals. These results are compared to the performance of humans, as well as other pattern matching and estimation algorithms. 1 INTRODUCTION Current automatic speech recognition systems rely almost exclusively on the acoustic speechsignal, and as a consequence, these systems often perform poorly in noisy Combining Visual and Acoustic Speech Signals 233 environments.


StarGAN-VC: Non-parallel many-to-many voice conversion with star generative adversarial networks

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This paper proposes a method that allows for non-parallel many-to-many voice conversion (VC) by using a variant of generative adversarial networks (GANs) called StarGAN. Our method, which we term StarGAN-VC, is remarkable in that it (1) requires neither parallel utterances, transcriptions, nor time alignment procedures for speech generator training, (2) simultaneously learns many-to-many mappings across different attribute domains using a single generator network, (3) is able to generate signals of converted speech quickly enough to allow for real-time implementations and (4) requires only several minutes of training examples to generate reasonably realistic-sounding speech. Subjective evaluation experiments on a non-parallel many-to-many speaker identity conversion task revealed that the proposed method obtained higher sound quality and speaker similarity than a state-of-the-art method based on variational autoencoding GANs.