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ANA starts testing autonomous bus operation at Haneda Airport

The Japan Times

ANA Holdings Inc., the operator of All Nippon Airways Co., said Wednesday it has started testing a semi-autonomous bus that will transport passengers and staff working at Tokyo's Haneda Airport. The company will conduct the test with the electric bus capable of carrying 57 passengers on a 1.9-kilometer route through the end of this month, aiming to start trial operation later in the year. The vehicle, with level-3 automation, allows drivers to turn their attention away from driving and engage in different tasks. "As the Tokyo Olympics are approaching, we hope more passengers from around the world will see our latest technology," ANA Senior Executive Vice President Shinzo Shimizu said in a ceremony at the airport. In 2018, the number of passengers who arrived at and departed from the airport increased 2.1 percent to 85 million, according to Japan Airport Terminal Co. which manages the Haneda Airport facilities.


Self-driving wheelchairs tested at Haneda Airport

The Japan Times

Trials have begun at Haneda Airport in Tokyo on next-generation self-driving electric wheelchairs to help elderly and other people get to boarding gates more easily. Japan Airlines aims to start using self-driving wheelchairs as early as the business year that starts next April. Currently, JAL offers manual wheelchairs at airports across the country. The self-driving wheelchairs JAL aims to introduce are designed to allow users to move without any escort. They automatically return to their home positions after use, making it unnecessary for workers to go and collect them.


Panasonic testing self-driving wheelchairs in airport

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Air travelers with disabilities will have a much easier time navigating one of Japan's main airports, thanks to new smart wheel chairs. Haneda Airport outside Tokyo is beginning tests of the WHILL NEXT, an app-controlled self-driving wheel chair that can take users around the airport and even bring their luggage in a separate wireless vehicle behind them. It is hoped the system will be in place, alongside new smart billboards and navigation apps, in time for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Designed specifically for navigating crowded areas, the smart wheel chair also has several other features that make it perfect for airports, such as the ability to link to sensor-equipped luggage carts that automatically follow the wheelchair without getting lost. The WHILL NEXT uses sensors and image recognition to detect obstacles and navigate the airport.


Panasonic introduces service robots to Tokyo Airport

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you're passing through Tokyo Narita Airport, there's a good chance your pre-flight dinner could be cleared up by a robot. Panasonic has started testing its HOSPI service robots at the airport to help combat'labour shortages' in Japan. The firm hopes if the Dalek-style robots are a success in the airport, they could be drafted in to help deal with the influx of tourists for the 2020 Olympics. Panasonic has begun testing service robots at the international airport to help combat'labour shortages' in Japan The robots were originally developed to be used in healthcare, delivering drugs around hospitals. Pre-installed mapping information allows HOSPI to move autonomously.


Japan installs rollerskating robots that speak Japanese AND English at Haneda airport

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Visitors arriving to Japan through Tokyo's Haneda airport will soon be greeted by a fleet of tiny humanoid robots. Standing just 90 centimetres tall, the humanoid named'EMIEW3' will guide users to the proper destination at the terminal and has the ability to communicate in both Japanese and English. Hitachi Ltd began its trials with the robots on Friday, and it's hoped that these assistants will be able to perform autonomously as early as December. Visitors arriving to Japan through Tokyo's Haneda airport will soon be greeted by a fleet of tiny humanoid robots. Standing just 90 centimetres tall, the humanoid named'EMIEW3' has the ability to communicate in both Japanese and English Trials will run through December at the airport's domestic Terminal 2, The Japan Times reports.


Adorable robots help travellers at Tokyo's Haneda airport

#artificialintelligence

It's a modest test, but it's ramping up to something much more impressive: In December, the robot is scheduled to return to the airport as a guide. Visitors will be able to ask for directions to say, the currency exchange counter, and EMIEW3 will physically lead them there. Neat! Hitachi's bot is particularly well suited to the task because of it's mobility: it can zip along at a steady 3.7MPH and even pick itself up if it falls down. Just don't ask it to take you directly to your gate -- airport security probably isn't used to clearing robots.


Adorable robots help travellers at Tokyo's Haneda airport

Engadget

Getting lost in an international airport is never fun -- but if you're lost in Japan's Haneda this month, you'll at least be able get help from an adorable talking robot. From now until the 14th, Hitachi is testing its EMIEW3 humanoid robot in the airport's passenger terminal. Over the course of two weeks, EMIEW3 will direct visitors to an information display and answer questions in both English and Japanese. It's a modest test, but it's ramping up to something much more impressive: In December, the robot is scheduled to return to the airport as a guide. Visitors will be able to ask for directions to say, the currency exchange counter, and EMIEW3 will physically lead them there.


Hitachi starts trials of EMIEW3 humanoid robot at Haneda airport

The Japan Times

Hitachi Ltd. started trials of its EMIEW3 humanoid robot at Tokyo's Haneda airport on Friday to aid foreign visitors to Japan. During the trials through December in the airport's domestic Terminal 2, the robot will communicate with passengers in Japanese and English at a designated information center as well as display information. The industrial conglomerate is hoping to enable the 90-centimeter-tall humanoid robot with autonomous capabilities to guide users to destinations starting around December. At a demonstration on Friday morning, a female foreign passenger asked EMIEW3 for directions to a foreign exchange counter. The humanoid robot at the information center called another EMIEW3 robot to take her to the location.