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Deep learning wins the day in Amazon's warehouse robot challenge

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Amazon is always on the lookout for new robotic technologies to improve efficiency in its warehouses, and this year deep learning appears to be leading the way. That's according to the results of the second annual Amazon Picking Challenge, which has been won by a joint team from the TU Delft Robotics Institute of the Netherlands and the company Delft Robotics. Amazon's 2016 event was held in conjunction with Robocup 2016 in Leipzig, Germany. Two parallel competitions took place: a Pick Task much like last year's, in which a mix of items has to be lifted from warehouse shelves and packed into a container; and a new "Stow Task," which involves taking items out of a tote and putting them onto the shelves. The Pick Task asked contestants to pick up and safely deposit 12 items from a mixed shelf into a container in the shortest possible time.


Amazon's latest robot champion uses deep learning to stock shelves

#artificialintelligence

Amazon has crowned the latest champion in its robotic picking challenge -- an annual competition that looks for robots that could one day work in the company's warehouses. It's basically American Idol, but for robotic arms that can grab items off a shelf and put them back again. Competitors are asked to handle a range of products, from toiletries to clothes, and then scored on speed and accuracy in stocking shelves. This year's contest was won by a joint team from the TU Delft Robotics Institute in the Netherlands and the company Delft Robotics (both named after the city of Delft). The team's robot managed to pick items from a mock Amazon warehouse shelf at a speed of around 100 an hour, reports TechRepublic, with a failure rate of 16.7 percent.


Deep Learning AI Leads Robot to Victory in Amazon's Picking Challenge

#artificialintelligence

While everyone keeps saying that robots are not a job security threat, it is also true that robots are steadily getting better at tasks. Enter this little bad boy, the robot that won Amazon's Picking Challenge. A team of engineers from Netherland's TU Del have won this year's challenge, both in the picking and stowing finals. They dubbed their creation "Delft." The cool thing is their robot is no ordinary warehouse bot; it relies on a suction cup, a "two-fingered" gripper, and the combination of deep learning artificial intelligence and depth-sensing cameras to get the job done.


Amazon Robot Challenge Helps Develop Automated Warehouse Workers

#artificialintelligence

Amazon's robotic Picking Challenge this past weekend demonstrated the advancement in deep learning robots and showed how they may come to rule fulfillment warehouses in the future. "The machine studied 3D scans of the stockroom items to help it decide how to manipulate items with its gripper and suction cup," Engadget explained. "That adaptive AI made a big difference, to put it mildly. The arm got a near-flawless score in the stowing half of the event, and was over three times faster at picking objects than last year's champion (100 per hour versus 30)." "The robot needs to be able to handle variety and operate in an unstructured environment," Carlos Hernández Corbato from TU Delft Robotics Institute told TechRepublic.com. "We are really happy that we have been able to develop this successful system."


Deep learning wins the day in Amazon's warehouse robot challenge

#artificialintelligence

Amazon is always on the lookout for new robotic technologies to improve efficiency in its warehouses, and this year deep learning appears to be leading the way. That's according to the results of the second annual Amazon Picking Challenge, which has been won by a joint team from the TU Delft Robotics Institute of the Netherlands and the company Delft Robotics. Amazon's 2016 event was held in conjunction with Robocup 2016 in Leipzig, Germany. Two parallel competitions took place: a Pick Task much like last year's, in which a mix of items has to be lifted from warehouse shelves and packed into a container; and a new "Stow Task," which involves taking items out of a tote and putting them onto the shelves. The Pick Task asked contestants to pick up and safely deposit 12 items from a mixed shelf into a container in the shortest possible time.


Deep learning wins the day in Amazon's warehouse robot challenge

#artificialintelligence

Amazon is always on the lookout for new robotic technologies to improve efficiency in its warehouses, and this year deep learning appears to be leading the way. That's according to the results of the second annual Amazon Picking Challenge, which has been won by a joint team from the TU Delft Robotics Institute of the Netherlands and the company Delft Robotics. Amazon's 2016 event was held in conjunction with Robocup 2016 in Leipzig, Germany. Two parallel competitions took place: a Pick Task much like last year's, in which a mix of items has to be lifted from warehouse shelves and packed into a container; and a new "Stow Task," which involves taking items out of a tote and putting them onto the shelves. The Pick Task asked contestants to pick up and safely deposit 12 items from a mixed shelf into a container in the shortest possible time.


Amazon's latest robot champion uses deep learning to stock shelves

#artificialintelligence

Amazon has crowned the latest champion in its robotic picking challenge -- an annual competition that looks for robots that could one day work in the company's warehouses. It's basically American Idol, but for robotic arms that can grab items off a shelf and put them back again. Competitors are asked to handle a range of products, from toiletries to clothes, and then scored on speed and accuracy in stocking shelves. This year's contest was won by a joint team from the TU Delft Robotics Institute in the Netherlands and the company Delft Robotics (both named after the city of Delft). The team's robot managed to pick items from a mock Amazon warehouse shelf at a speed of around 100 an hour, reports TechRepublic, with a failure rate of 16.7 percent.


Amazon robot challenge winner counts on deep learning AI

Engadget

Even the also-rans fared better, TechRepublic notes. Despite tougher demands, only four competitors failed to score (versus half in the 2015 challenge). Nearly half of the entries managed over 40 points, which would have been good enough to get third place a year ago. TU Delft and other entrants aren't about to replace people any time soon. Human workers typically pick 400 items per hour, and they won't suffer the 16.7 percent failure rate of the Picking Challenge leader.