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GPT-3 Creative Fiction

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What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.


Machine learning will help to grow artificial organs – IAM Network

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Akbar Solo Researchers in Moscow and America have discovered how to use machine learning to grow artificial organs, especially to tackle blindness Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Ivannikov Institute for System Programming, and the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Schepens Eye Research Institute have developed a neural network capable of recognizing retinal tissues during the process of their differentiation in a dish. Unlike humans, the algorithm achieves this without the need to modify cells, making the method suitable for growing retinal tissue for developing cell replacement therapies to treat blindness and conducting research into new drugs. The study was published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience. How would this enable easier organ growth? This would allow to expand the applications of the technology for multiple fields including the drug discovery and development of cell replacement therapies to treat blindnessIn multicellular organisms, the cells making up different organs and tissues are not the same.


Introduction to AI & ML techniques in Drug Discovery

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A perfect course for Bachelors / Masters / PhD students who are getting started into Drug Discovery research. This course is specially designed keeping in view of beginner level knowledge on Artificial Intelligence, Machine learning and computational drug discovery applications for science students. By the end of this course participants will be equipped with the basic knowledge required to navigate their drug discovery project making use of the Artificial Intelligence and Machine learning based tools.Who this course is for:


Machine learning helps grow artificial organs

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IMAGE: Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Ivannikov Institute for System Programming, and the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Schepens Eye Research Institute have developed a neural network capable of... view more Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Ivannikov Institute for System Programming, and the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Schepens Eye Research Institute have developed a neural network capable of recognizing retinal tissues during the process of their differentiation in a dish. Unlike humans, the algorithm achieves this without the need to modify cells, making the method suitable for growing retinal tissue for developing cell replacement therapies to treat blindness and conducting research into new drugs. In multicellular organisms, the cells making up different organs and tissues are not the same. They have distinct functions and properties, acquired in the course of development. They start out the same, as so-called stem cells, which have the potential to become any kind of cell the mature organism incorporates.


A deep reinforcement learning framework to identify key players in complex networks

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Network science is an academic field that aims to unveil the structure and dynamics behind networks, such as telecommunication, computer, biological and social networks. One of the fundamental problems that network scientists have been trying to solve in recent years entails identifying an optimal set of nodes that most influence a network's functionality, referred to as key players. Identifying key players could greatly benefit many real-world applications, for instance, enhancing techniques for the immunization of networks, as well as aiding epidemic control, drug design and viral marketing. Due to its NP-hard nature, however, solving this problem using exact algorithms with polynomial time complexity has proved highly challenging. Researchers at National University of Defense Technology in China, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have recently developed a deep reinforcement learning (DRL) framework, dubbed FINDER, that could identify key players in complex networks more efficiently.


Abolish the #TechToPrisonPipeline

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The authors of the Harrisburg University study make explicit their desire to provide "a significant advantage for law enforcement agencies and other intelligence agencies to prevent crime" as a co-author and former NYPD police officer outlined in the original press release.[38] At a time when the legitimacy of the carceral state, and policing in particular, is being challenged on fundamental grounds in the United States, there is high demand in law enforcement for research of this nature, research which erases historical violence and manufactures fear through the so-called prediction of criminality. Publishers and funding agencies serve a crucial role in feeding this ravenous maw by providing platforms and incentives for such research. The circulation of this work by a major publisher like Springer would represent a significant step towards the legitimation and application of repeatedly debunked, socially harmful research in the real world. To reiterate our demands, the review committee must publicly rescind the offer for publication of this specific study, along with an explanation of the criteria used to evaluate it. Springer must issue a statement condemning the use of criminal justice statistics to predict criminality and acknowledging their role in incentivizing such harmful scholarship in the past. Finally, all publishers must refrain from publishing similar studies in the future.


AI Learns Chemistry to Predict How to Make Medicines

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Researchers have invented a machine learning algorithm that forecasts the outcome of chemical reactions with much greater accuracy than proficient chemists and proposes ways to make complex particles, removing a weighty hurdle in drug innovation. University of Cambridge researchers have revealed that an algorithm can forecast the outcomes of complex chemical reactions with above 90% accuracy, overtaking trained chemists. The algorithm also displays chemists how to make target mixtures, providing the chemical "map" to the required destination. The outcomes are stated in two studies in the journals ACS Central Science and Chemical Communications. A central task in drug discovery and materials science is discovering ways to build complex organic molecules by chemically assembling together elementary building blocks.


Research enables artificial intelligence approach to create AAV capsids for gene therapies

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Cambridge, MA, November 28, 2019 -- Dyno Therapeutics, a biotechnology company pioneering use of artificial intelligence in gene therapy, today announced a publication in the journal Science that demonstrates the power of a comprehensive machine-guided approach to engineer improved capsids for gene therapy delivery. The research was conducted by Dyno co-founders Eric D. Kelsic, Ph.D. and Sam Sinai, Ph.D., together with colleague Pierce Ogden, Ph.D., at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard Medical School laboratory of George M. Church, Ph.D., a Dyno scientific co-founder. AAV capsids are presently the most commonly used vector for gene therapy because of their established ability to deliver genetic material to patient organs with a proven safety profile. However, there are only a few naturally occurring AAV capsids, and they are deficient in essential properties for optimal gene therapy, such as targeted delivery, evasion of the immune system, higher levels of viral production, and greater transduction efficiency. Starting at Harvard in 2015, the authors set out to overcome the limitations of current capsids by developing new machine-guided technologies to rapidly and systematically engineer a suite of new, improved capsids for widespread therapeutic use.


Research enables artificial intelligence approach to create AAV capsids for gene therapies

#artificialintelligence

Cambridge, MA, November 28, 2019 -- Dyno Therapeutics, a biotechnology company pioneering use of artificial intelligence in gene therapy, today announced a publication in the journal Science that demonstrates the power of a comprehensive machine-guided approach to engineer improved capsids for gene therapy delivery. The research was conducted by Dyno co-founders Eric D. Kelsic, Ph.D. and Sam Sinai, Ph.D., together with colleague Pierce Ogden, Ph.D., at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard Medical School laboratory of George M. Church, Ph.D., a Dyno scientific co-founder. AAV capsids are presently the most commonly used vector for gene therapy because of their established ability to deliver genetic material to patient organs with a proven safety profile. However, there are only a few naturally occurring AAV capsids, and they are deficient in essential properties for optimal gene therapy, such as targeted delivery, evasion of the immune system, higher levels of viral production, and greater transduction efficiency. Starting at Harvard in 2015, the authors set out to overcome the limitations of current capsids by developing new machine-guided technologies to rapidly and systematically engineer a suite of new, improved capsids for widespread therapeutic use.


Large expert-curated database for benchmarking document similarity detection in biomedical literature search

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Document recommendation systems for locating relevant literature have mostly relied on methods developed a decade ago. This is largely due to the lack of a large offline gold-standard benchmark of relevant documents that cover a variety of research fields such that newly developed literature search techniques can be compared, improved and translated into practice. To overcome this bottleneck, we have established the RElevant LIterature SearcH consortium consisting of more than 1500 scientists from 84 countries, who have collectively annotated the relevance of over 180 000 PubMed-listed articles with regard to their respective seed (input) article/s. The majority of annotations were contributed by highly experienced, original authors of the seed articles. The collected data cover 76% of all unique PubMed Medical Subject Headings descriptors. No systematic biases were observed across different experience levels, research fields or time spent on annotations.