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Remote Sensing Scientist at Leidos in Arlington, VA

#artificialintelligence

Want to be a part of an elite team where our innovative technical solutions are delivered to customers that advance the state of the art while addressing long-term problems of importance to national security? At our Leidos' Multi-Spectrum Warfare Research and Analytics Systems (MSWRAS) Division, an organization in the Leidos Innovation Center (LInC), we are looking for you, our next Scientist who specializes in remote sensing data analytics. Join our team of Ph.D. level peers in designing and developing advanced technology-based solutions for contract research and development projects working in our Arlington, VA office. Fun roles you will have in this job: Describe instances of successful, proven, and demonstrable experience contributing to the technical work as part of cross-discipline teams in the development and integration of software-based solutions for competitive, contract-based applied research programs Work with teams composed of members from industry, small businesses, and academic-based researchers and should have experience working on projects focused on multiple technical fields such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, engineering, and software development and integration Describe how the work products to which they contributed had solved customers' problems in such domains as energy, health, and national security or in the commercial sector Work within the MSWRAS Division and across the LInC, performing basic and applied contract research and development projects both leading and working under the guidance of senior scientists and engineers. Processing, interpreting and analyzing large volumes of data collected by remote sensing platforms but may also include other types of phenomenological data such as field measurements, or weather data Independently design and undertake new research as well as partner in a team environment across organizations Contribute to the development of creative and innovative R&D approaches to solving major remote sensing analytics challenges and work with potential sponsors (customers or internal champions) to secure funding for new research efforts based on those topics Contribute to the productivity of teams composed of fellow researchers, data scientists, data engineers, and software engineers to execute complex R&D programs Under the guidance of a senior scientist or engineer, design and develop or integrate secure and scalable applications that are part of broader solutions, that are applicable across multiple domains.


The human brain built by AI: A transatlantic collaboration

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The Helmholtz International BigBrain Analytics and Learning Laboratory (HIBALL) is a collaboration between McGill University and Forschungszentrum Jülich to develop next-generation high-resolution human brain models using cutting-edge Machine- and Deep Learning methods and high-performance computing. HIBALL is based on the high-resolution BigBrain model first published by the Jülich and McGill teams in 2013. Over the next five years, the lab will be funded with a total of up to 6 million Euro by the German Helmholtz Association, Forschungszentrum Jülich, and Healthy Brains, Healthy Lives at McGill University. In 2003, when Jülich neuroscientist Katrin Amunts and her Canadian colleague Alan Evans began scanning 7,404 histological sections of a human brain, it was completely unclear whether it would ever be possible to reconstruct this brain on the computer in three dimensions. At that time, there were no technical possibilities to cope with the huge amount of data.


AI is reinventing the way we invent

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Drug discovery is a hugely expensive and often frustrating process. Medicinal chemists must guess which compounds might make good medicines, using their knowledge of how a molecule's structure affects its properties. They synthesize and test countless variants, and most are failures. "Coming up with new molecules is still an art, because you have such a huge space of possibilities," says Barzilay. "It takes a long time to find good drug candidates." By speeding up this critical step, deep learning could offer far more opportunities for chemists to pursue, making drug discovery much quicker.


Top 10 Courses to Learn AI, Machine Learning and Deep Learning

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Supervised, semi-supervised or unsupervised deep learning is part of a broader family of machine learning methods, that teach you the basics of neural networks. Learn from the Top 10 Deep Learning Courses curated exclusively by Analytics Insight and build your deep learning models with Python and NumPy. Taught by one of the best Data Science experts of 2020 Andrew Ng, this course teaches you how to build a successful machine learning project. You will understand the complex ML settings, such as mismatched training/test sets, and comparing to and/or surpassing human-level performance. Over 20 videos spread across the entire module will explain you error analysis and different kind of the learning techniques.


Computer vision(CV): Leading public companies named

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CV is a nascent market but it contains a plethora of both big technology companies and disruptors. Technology players with large sets of visual data are leading the pack in CV, with Chinese and US tech giants dominating each segment of the value chain. Google has been at the forefront of CV applications since 2012. Over the years the company has hired several ML experts. In 2014 it acquired the deep learning start-up DeepMind. Google's biggest asset is its wealth of customer data provided by their search business and YouTube.


Startup Tenstorrent shows AI is changing computing and vice versa

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That year, numerous experienced computer chip designers set out on their own to design novel kinds of parts to improve the performance of artificial intelligence. It's taken a few years, but the world is finally seeing what those young hopefuls have been working on. The new chips coming out suggest, as ZDNet has reported in past, that AI is totally changing the nature of computing. It also suggests that changes in computing are going to have an effect on how artificial intelligence programs, such as deep learning neural networks, are designed. Case in point, startup Tenstorrent, founded in 2016 and headquartered in Toronto, Canada, on Thursday unveiled its first chip, "Grayskull," at a microprocessor conference run by the legendary computer chip analysis firm The Linley Group.


AI Hype and Radiology: A Plea for Realism and Accuracy

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This opinion piece is inspired by the old Danish proverb: "Making predictions is hard, especially about the future" (1). As every reader knows, the momentum of artificial intelligence (AI) and the eventual implementation of deep learning models seem assured. Some pundits have gone considerably further, however, and predicted a sweeping AI takeover of radiology. Although many radiologists support AI and believe it will enable greater efficiency, a recent study of medical students found very different reactions (2). While such doomsday predictions are understandably attention-grabbing, they are highly unlikely, at least in the short term.


AI For All: The US Introduces New Bill For Affordable Research

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Yesterday, AIM published an article on how difficult it is for the small labs and individual researchers to persevere in the high compute, high-cost industry of deep learning. Today, the policymakers of the US have introduced a new bill that will ensure deep learning is affordable for all. The National AI Research Resource Task Force Act was introduced in the House by Representatives Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA) and her colleagues. This bill was met with unanimous support from the top universities and companies, which are engaged in artificial intelligence (AI) research. Some of the well-known supporters include Stanford University, Princeton University, UCLA, Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins University, OpenAI, Mozilla, Google, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft, IBM and NVIDIA amongst others.


Security Think Tank: AI cyber attacks will be a step-change for criminals

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Whether or not your organisation suffers a cyber attack has long been considered a case of'when, not if', with cyber attacks having a huge impact on organisations. In 2018, 2.8 billion consumer data records were exposed in 342 breaches, ranging from credential stuffing to ransomware, at an estimated cost of more than $654bn. In 2019, this had increased to an exposure of 4.1 billion records. While the use of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning as a primary offensive tool in cyber attacks is not yet mainstream, its use and capabilities are growing and becoming more sophisticated. In time, cyber criminals will, inevitably, take advantage of AI, and such a move will increase threats to digital security and increase the volume and sophistication of cyber attacks.


How AI helps historians solve ancient puzzles

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Uncovering evidence for historical theories and identifying patterns in past events has long been hindered by the labour-intensive process of inputting data from artefacts and handwritten records. The adoption of artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques is speeding up such research and drawing attention to overlooked information. But this approach, known as "digital humanities", is in a battle for funding against more future-focused applications of AI. "There is a lot of interest in digital humanities, but there is not a lot of money," says Ilan Shimshoni, professor of computer vision and machine learning at the University of Haifa in Israel, where he works on archaeological projects that include reassembling artefacts from photos of fragments. "If you want to do an analysis of Facebook you'll get much more money than if you want to look at ancient Greek artefacts." Archaeological puzzles may not seem as urgent as computer science projects in healthcare, finance and other industries, but applying algorithmic techniques to historical research can improve AI's capabilities, says Ayellet Tal, an archaeological and computer science researcher at Israel's Technion University.