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Medical video game maker Level Ex acquired by surgical technology firm Brainlab - 360WiSE MEDiA

#artificialintelligence

Level Ex, a Chicago startup that makes medical-training video games for doctors, has been acquired by Berlin-based medical-technology company Brainlab, the companies announced today. The companies did not disclose the terms of their deal, although Level Ex CEO Sam Glassenberg told MobiHealthNews that his company would continue to operate under the new ownership as an independent entity. "We're a bunch of game developers that have been parachuted into the healthcare industry, and we're constantly seeing technology that is, like, two decades behind what we're doing in the entertainment industry," he said. If you go to their offices and see their tech, it's incredibly forward looking. Learn on-demand, earn credit, find products and solutions.


The female game designers fighting back on abortion rights

The Guardian

You're part of an underground network of feminists in Chicago that provide illegal (at the time) abortion services to vulnerable, pregnant people with few options. Despite the risk of imprisonment, and the ways that your personal experiences may not always perfectly align with your activism, you persist. It's a live-action roleplaying game by Jon Cole and Kelley Vanda called The Abortionists, which requires three players, one facilitator, six hours and a willingness to dig deep into the painful history of reproductive rights in the United States. That history has terrifying relevance in 2019, as numerous states pass laws that put their residents in a reality where abortion is functionally illegal. Based on the real-life work of a 1970s activist group called Jane, it challenges its participants to think about the "internal landscapes" of its players, and how they deal with the larger political and personal landscape of their world.


Your doctor may be playing medical video games at work. That could be good for your health

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Doctors can perfect their craft playing Level Ex medical video games, and even earn continuing education credits towards maintaining their licenses. Can playing video games be a prescription for good health? Two to three times a week, the UCSF/Stanford-trained internist and founder of the Turntable Health primary care clinic, is on his smartphone playing video games. "People who are good at video games are actually good at some aspects of clinical medicine." Instead, ZDoggMD, as he's known by his pseudonym as a producer of healthcare videos and live shows, is among the 400,000 medical professionals practicing the craft of medicine through a series of games from Level Ex, a Chicago videogames developer whose titles are specially designed for doctors, med students and other healthcare providers.