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UK rolls out AI-based cancer detection for NHS patients

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Leader in AI-powered cancer diagnostics, Ibex Medical Analytics and provider of digital pathology services in the NHS, LDPath, have announced the UK's first rollout of clinical grade AI application for cancer detection in pathology. This platform will support pathologists in enhancing diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. Over the years, a global increase in cancer cases has coincided with a decline in the number of pathologists around the world. Traditional pathology involves manual processes that have remained the same for years. These processes involve slides to be analysed by pathologists using microscopes, and reporting is often carried out on pieces of paper.


AI Powered Cancer Screening Coming to the NHS -- AI Daily - Artificial Intelligence News

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With Ibex's Galen Prostate solution, prostate biopsies will be reviewed using a highly accurate AI algorithm that checks for inconsistencies between the pathologist's findings and what it detects. In the case of a significant discrepancy, the pathologists will be notified, creating a valuable layer of protection against mistakes, potentially saving many patients from false negatives. In an ongoing audit at the request of the NHS Trust, their AI algorithm was able to spot otherwise unnoticed prostate cancer, showing just how valuable this tech is. The use of AI shows great promise in healthcare, and it's reassuring to see plans for its implementation in cancer screening. Without doubt, it won't be long before we see artificial intelligence being a crucial tool to all avenues of medicine.


Artificial Intelligence: Is It Armageddon for Breast Radiologists? – Tech Check News

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) has taken radiology by storm, in particular, mammogram interpretation, and we have seen a recent surge in the number of publications on potential uses of AI in breast radiology. Breast cancer exerts a lot of burden on the National Health Service (NHS) and is the second most common cancer in the UK as of 2018. New cases of breast cancer have been on the rise in the past decade, while the survival rate has been improving. Source: Artificial Intelligence: Is It Armageddon for Breast Radiologists?


A helping hand: How AI can help to relieve pressure on the NHS

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Covid-19 has caused an unprecedented amount of uncertainty across the world, with businesses and people alike feeling the strain. However, amidst all of this uncertainty, one thing has remained constant and that is the unwavering efforts of those on the NHS frontline. While we have passed the peak of the pandemic in the UK, we must not forget the immense strain which the NHS has been put under. It is a testament to all of those working within the service that it has remained firm, saving countless lives in the process. Moving forwards, though, we must find a way to ease the burden on NHS workers.


The technology allowing self-isolating NHS staff to support the front line

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Proximie is being deployed across a number of NHS sites, to support the national efforts to fight COVID-19. Proximie uses a combination of machine learning, artificial intelligence and augmented reality, aimed to empower surgeons and clinicians, to virtually and practically interact with each other from anywhere. The platform, which was founded by Dr. Nadine Hachach-Haram FRCS (Plast), BEM, consultant plastic surgeon and head of clinical innovation at Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, is being used across a host of NHS sites, as the country battles the pandemic. From enabling self-isolating clinicians to remotely support colleagues on the front line, to virtually connecting MDTs for hand trauma and cancer management, so that every clinician can connect and collaborate off site during COVID-19, the platform is being applied in a number of different ways to support and amplify frontline clinicians. Using augmented reality, healthcare practitioners can remotely interact in a procedure or assessment from start to finish, and mentor a local clinician through a live operation, in a visually and intuitive way.


How NHS 111 London Is Using AI To Ensure Patients Get The Care They Need Urgently

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LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - 2019/12/10: A London ambulance parked outside the East London hospital. In London, the National Health Service's 111 helpline receives up to 41,000 urgent calls every week. With this number constantly growing, health and clinical advisors must provide advice to patients with potentially serious medical conditions accurately and quickly. However, NHS 111 London has previously struggled to deliver a consistent patient experience and meet healthcare outcomes because it lacked a way to track and prioritize patients with developing or known medical conditions. Martin Taylor, deputy CEO and cofounder of cloud contact center platform Content Guru, says: "Patients were routed to any available call handler, and this varied each time they called NHS 111 (regardless of the time between calls), leading to patients having to repeat their details, symptoms, and developments. "Further to this, the NHS were unable to track repeat callers and therefore could not monitor changes in symptoms effectively.


How is AI and machine learning benefiting the healthcare industry?

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In order to help build increasingly effective care pathways in healthcare, modern artificial intelligence technologies must be adopted and embraced. Events such as the AI & Machine Learning Convention are essential in providing medical experts around the UK access to the latest technologies, products and services that are revolutionising the future of care pathways in the healthcare industry. AI has the potential to save the lives of current and future patients and is something that is starting to be seen across healthcare services across the UK. Looking at diagnostics alone, there have been large scale developments in rapid image recognition, symptom checking and risk stratification. AI can also be used to personalise health screening and treatments for cancer, not only benefiting the patient but clinicians too – enabling them to make the best use of their skills, informing decisions and saving time.


UK public sector failing to be open about its use of AI, review finds – TechCrunch

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A report into the use of artificial intelligence by the U.K.'s public sector has warned that the government is failing to be open about automated decision-making technologies which have the potential to significantly impact citizens' lives. Ministers have been especially bullish on injecting new technologies into the delivery of taxpayer-funded healthcare -- with health minister Matt Hancock setting out a tech-fueled vision of "preventative, predictive and personalised care" in 2018, calling for a root and branch digital transformation of the National Health Service (NHS) to support piping patient data to a new generation of "healthtech" apps and services. He has also personally championed a chatbot startup, Babylon Health, that's using AI for healthcare triage -- and which is now selling a service in to the NHS. Policing is another area where AI is being accelerated into U.K. public service delivery, with a number of police forces trialing facial recognition technology -- and London's Met Police switching over to a live deployment of the AI technology just last month. However the rush by cash-strapped public services to tap AI "efficiencies" risks glossing over a range of ethical concerns about the design and implementation of such automated systems, from fears about embedding bias and discrimination into service delivery and scaling harmful outcomes to questions of consent around access to the data sets being used to build AI models and human agency over automated outcomes, to name a few of the associated concerns -- all of which require transparency into AIs if there's to be accountability over automated outcomes.


AI in Health and Care Award launches in the UK - EMR Industry

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Innovators in England are now able to submit their applications for a new AI in Health and Care Award launched by health secretary Matt Hancock to speed up testing, evaluation and adoption of the "most promising" AI technologies for healthcare. The initiative will see £140 million be made available during the next three years, with a call for applications running twice a year. Initially, the award will focus on four areas: screening, diagnosis, clinical decision support and system efficiency. Run by the Accelerated Access Collaborative, NHSX and the National Institute for Health Research, it forms part of the £250m announcement made in August to support the creation of an AI Lab for the health service. "Too many good ideas in the NHS never make it past the pilot stage," Hancock said in a speech at the Parliament & Healthtech conference in London on Tuesday.


Minister announces £140 million NHS AI Award UKAuthority

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Health Minister Matt Hancock has announced the provision of £140 million to support the development of artificial intelligence services for healthcare. He said the money will be made available over the next three years through the National AI Lab – created last August within NHSX – through competitions run twice a year through the NHS Accelerated Access Collaborative. Announcing the plan in a speech to the Healthtech Alliance, Hancock said the focus will be on "finding and boosting existing technologies with serious scale-up potential", and that the awards will cover all stages of the product cyber, from proof of concept to initial adoption in the NHS. The first call for proposals will focus on screening, diagnosis, clinical decision support and system efficiency. He added that the AI Lab, which provides a forum for academics, specialists and technology companies to harness the technology for healthcare, will also have a skunkworks unit to build and rapidly test prototypes.