Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


Vladimir Vapnik: Deep Learning and the Essence of Intelligence AI Podcast Clips

#artificialintelligence

Vladimir Vapnik is the co-inventor of support vector machines, support vector clustering, VC theory, and many foundational ideas in statistical learning. He was born in the Soviet Union, worked at the Institute of Control Sciences in Moscow, then in the US, worked at AT&T, NEC Labs, Facebook AI Research, and now is a professor at Columbia University. His work has been cited over 200,000 times. Subscribe to this YouTube channel or connect on: - Twitter: https://twitter.com/lexfridman


Artificial Intelligence and the Manufacturing of Reality

#artificialintelligence

In 2016, a third of surveyed Americans told researchers they believed the government was concealing what they knew about the "North Dakota Crash," a conspiracy made up for the purposes of the survey by the researchers themselves. This crash never happened, but it highlights the flaws humans carry with them in deciding what is or is not real. The internet and other technologies have made it easier to weaponize and exploit these flaws, beguiling more people faster and more compellingly than ever before. It is likely artificial intelligence will be used to exploit the weaknesses inherent in human nature at a scale, speed, and level of effectiveness previously unseen. Adversaries like Russia could pursue goals for using these manipulations to subtly reshape how targets view the world around them, effectively manufacturing their reality.


AI is evolving faster than you think…

#artificialintelligence

I usually cover the developments in the field of Artificial Intelligence as part of my regular feature titled Tech Diaries, but this week was so jam-packed with AI news that I had to do write a separate piece. One story that stood out from the rest was of the AI-enabled photo-editing App called FaceApp. It is owned by Russia-based Wireless Lab and has been around since 2017, but with the recent addition of a feature which lets you see your future self made it go viral last week. My Facebook newsfeed was full of people showing off their'Now & Then' pictures -- Looked enticing but I held off the temptation to generate an older version of myself. For starters, some reports suggest that the App has collected more than 150 million photos of people's faces since its launch & according to its terms of service it can use the huge database in whatever way it wants.


Is FaceApp an evil plot by 'the Russians' to steal your data? Not quite Arwa Mahdawi

The Guardian

Over the last few days the #faceappchallenge has taken over social media. This "challenge" involves downloading a selfie-editing tool called FaceApp and using one of its filters to digitally age your face. You then post the photo of your wizened old self on the internet and everyone laughs uproariously. You get a small surge of dopamine from gathering a few online likes before existential ennui sets in once again. On Monday, as the #faceappchallenge went viral, Joshua Nozzi, a software developer, warned people to "BE CAREFUL WITH FACEAPP….it Some media outlets picked this claim up and privacy concerns about the app began to mount. Concern escalated further when people started to point out that FaceApp is Russian. "The app that you're willingly giving all your facial data to says the company's location is in Saint-Petersburg, Russia," tweeted the New York Times's Charlie Warzel. And we all know what those Russians are like, don't we? They want to harvest your data for nefarious ...


Russia Demands Tinder Share User Data, Messages With Its National Intelligence Agencies

TIME - Tech

Russia is requiring dating app Tinder to hand over data on its users -- including messages -- to national intelligence agencies, part of the country's widening crackdown on internet freedoms. The communications regulator said Monday that Tinder was included on a list of online services operating in Russia that are required to provide user data on demand to Russian authorities, including the FSB security agency. Tinder, an app where people looking for dates swipe left or right on the profiles of other users, will have to cooperate with Russian authorities or face being completely blocked in the country. The rule would apply to any user's data that goes through Russian servers, including messages to other people on the app. Tinder was not immediately available for comment.


Russia orders Tinder dating app to share user data on demand

The Japan Times

MOSCOW - Russia said on Monday it had added the popular dating app Tinder to a list of entities obliged to hand over user data and messages to law enforcement agencies on demand, including the main successor agency to the Soviet-era KGB. Roskomnadzor, Russia's telecoms and media regulator, said in a statement that Tinder had been added to its special register at the end of last month after providing the requisite information to allow itself to be added. The move, part of a wider Russian drive to regulate the internet, means that Tinder will be obliged to store users' metadata on servers inside Russia for at least six months as well as their text, audio or video messages. Russia's law enforcement agencies such as the FSB security service, which took over most of the KGB's functions, can require companies on the register to hand over data on demand. The Russian state's increased regulation of the internet has drawn criticism from some opposition politicians and sparked protests from campaigners who are concerned about what they say is creeping Chinese-style control of the online world.


Deepfakes Are Getting Better. But They're Still Easy to Spot

#artificialintelligence

Last week, Mona Lisa smiled. A big, wide smile, followed by what appeared to be a laugh and the silent mouthing of words that could only be an answer to the mystery that had beguiled her viewers for centuries. A great many people were unnerved. Mona's "living portrait," along with likenesses of Marilyn Monroe, Salvador Dali, and others, demonstrated the latest technology in deepfakes--seemingly realistic video or audio generated using machine learning. Developed by researchers at Samsung's AI lab in Moscow, the portraits display a new method to create credible videos from a single image.


Samsung deepfake AI could fabricate a video of you from a single profile pic

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence developed by a Samsung lab in Russia can fabricate video from a single image, including a painting. Imagine someone creating a deepfake video of you simply by stealing your Facebook profile pic. The bad guys don't have their hands on that tech yet, but Samsung has figured out how to make it happen. Software for creating deepfakes -- fabricated clips that make people appear to do or say things they never did -- usually requires big data sets of images in order to create a realistic forgery. Now Samsung has developed a new artificial intelligence system that can generate a fake clip by feeding it as little as one photo.


Samsung developing algorithm that only needs one picture to create a fake video

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As if the world of deep-faked pictures and video wasn't scary enough, researchers from Samsung's AI center in Moscow have demonstrated an algorithm that can fabricate videos using only one image. In a video demonstration and a paper published in the pre-print journal ArXiv, the researchers show the capabilities of what is described as'one-shot' and'few-shot' machine learning. The results of their system bring to life popular faces like those of surrealist painter Salvador Dali and actress Marilyn Monroe using a single still image. The more images that are fed into the program, the more realistic the resulting video becomes. Though a single image translated into a moving face may look noticeably altered, a sample of 32 images produces a moving picture with near lifelike accuracy.


Russia launches case against Facebook and Twitter over 'breach of data laws'

The Independent - Tech

Russia has launched a civil case against Facebook and Twitter for failing to provide details about how they will comply with the country's data laws, according to local media reports. Communication watchdog Roskomnadzor said the social media firms had failed to explain exactly how local laws would be adhered to considering the companies both store data in centres outside of Russia. The Interfax news agency quoted the watchdog as saying that Twitter and Facebook had not explained how and when they would comply with legislation that requires all servers used to store Russians' personal data to be located in Russia. The agency's head, Alexander Zharov, was quoted as saying the companies have a month to provide information or else action would be taken against them. Russia has introduced tougher internet laws in the last five years, requiring search engines to delete some search results, messaging services to share encryption keys with security services and social networks to store Russian users' personal data on servers within the country.