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AI-Powered DeepFaceDrawing Turns Sketches Into Photorealistic Portraits - The Flighter

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A research team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the City University of Hong Kong have unveiled DeepFaceDrawing, an AI-powered framework that turns sketches into photorealistic portraits. This deep learning system uses modules to generate the images, or in other words, it identifies the most notable facial features individually, like the eyes, nose, mouth, face shape, etc., before these vectors are merged to create realistic images. There are other deep image-to-image translation techniques that may generate face images from freehand sketches faster, but they require professional sketches or even edge maps as input. DeepFaceDrawing can implicitly model the shape space of recognizable face images and then proceeds to synthesize a face image in this space to approximate an input sketch. Our method essentially uses input sketches as soft constraints and is thus able to produce high-quality face images even from rough and/or incomplete sketches," said researcher Shu-Yu Chen.


Artificial Intelligence That Can Create Tremendously Real Human Portraits From Random Drawings - Somag News

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A new Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithm, developed by scientists at the University of Hong Kong, can only create enormously realistic photos from sketch drawings. Researchers say the new algorithm can be used to identify suspects in police investigations. Despite the concerns of names like Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies continue to penetrate every aspect of our lives. AI, which has a place in many sectors including security, health, military, automotive and transportation, is becoming more and more powerful. According to the information reported by the website of New Scientist, Hongbo Fu and colleagues from the University of Hong Kong developed an algorithm that can instantly convert a very simple sketch drawing representing the face of a person into portrait photography.


Chinese researchers unveil AI that can turn simple drawings into fake photorealistic pictures

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new artificial intelligence can transform simple sketches of a face into fabricated photorealistic pictures. The AI, called DeepFaceDrawing, was invented by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and can extrapolate on rough and even incomplete sketches. According to them, the technology is designed to help'users with little training in drawing to produce high-quality images from rough or even incomplete freehand sketches.' Researchers from China demonstrated an AI that can generate photorealistic pictures from sketches (pictured). The system works by examining details of a drawing and then checking those features against a database of facial features.


'DeepFaceDrawing' AI can turn simple sketches into detailed photo portraits

Engadget

Researchers have found a way to turn simple line drawings into photo-realistic facial images. Developed by a team at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, DeepFaceDrawing uses artificial intelligence to help "users with little training in drawing to produce high-quality images from rough or even incomplete freehand sketches." This isn't the first time we've seen tech like this (remember the horrifying results of Pix2Pix's autofill tool?), but it is certainly the most advanced to date, and it doesn't require the same level of detail in source sketches as previous iterations have. It works largely through probability -- instead of requiring detailed eyelid or lip shapes, for example, the software refers to a database of faces and facial components, and considers how each facial element works with each other. Eyes, nose, mouth, face shape and hair type are all considered separately, and then assembled into a single image. As the paper explains, "Recent deep image-to-image translation techniques allow fast generation of face images from freehand sketches.


Chinese firm's facial recognition could ID you under a mask Digital Trends

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Let's say you live in a country where there's been reports of massive outbreaks of a highly contagious viral infection. Hypothetically, let's call this infection "coronavirus." To avoid spreading this "coronavirus," many people have taken to wearing medical face masks when going about their everyday life. These masks don't do much, medically speaking, but it's considered the polite thing to do. Now, let's also say that the government there is notorious for widespread and unregulated use of facial-recognition technology as a way to both fight crime and to identify and silence political dissidents.


Coronavirus is the first big test for futuristic tech that can prevent pandemics

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The novel coronavirus that first appeared in mainland China has now spread across the world, with more than 82,000 reported cases and nearly 3,000 deaths, as of Thursday. And right alongside the outbreak is the deployment of myriad types of AI-powered tech that is now being put on full display. New technology like infrared thermometers -- potentially unreliable devices known as "thermometer guns" -- are becoming increasingly commonplace in China, where health workers regularly check people's temperatures. Somewhat behind the scenes, however, more futuristic technology powered by artificial intelligence is helping to identify coronavirus symptoms, find new treatments, and track the spread of the disease. Meanwhile, robots are making interactions with and treatment of sick patients easier.


Chinese facial recognition can now identify people wearing masks

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Chinese companies specialising in facial recognition have upgraded the technology to identify people wearing masks in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. Chinese company SenseTime, described as'the most valuable AI startup in the world' and worth at least $4.5billion, is one of several firms improving its facial recognition to ensure a person cna be identified without them taking off their mask. Instead of relying on having to see a person's mouth, the system is able to learn a person's identify from just their eyes and upper nose region of their face. People around the world are increasingly opting to wear medical masks and even respirators to prevent catching the potentially fatal COVID-19. The disease has claimed the lives of more than 2,700 people around the world and infected a total of around 80,000.


How Facial Recognition Can Track & Kill You w/ Shaun Moore The Skyy John Show

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Sign in to report inappropriate content. Shaun Moore is the founder and CEO of Trueface, a facial recognition company working to make computers see like humans. Trueface is involved with many companies and most recently has been helping the US Air Force increase its base security. In the podcast we talk about how facial recognition should be used, the ethics in its application, and the consequences of countries like China using the technology.


All it takes to fool facial recognition at airports and border crossings is a printed mask, researchers found

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Facial recognition is being widely embraced as a security tool -- law enforcement and corporations alike are rolling it out to keep tabs on who's accessing airports, stores, and smartphones. As it turns out, the technology is fallible. Researchers with the artificial-intelligence firm Kneron announced that they were able to fool some facial-recognition systems using a printed mask depicting a different person's face. The researchers, who tested systems across three continents, said they fooled payment tablets run by the Chinese companies Alipay and WeChat, as well as a system at a border checkpoint in China. In Amsterdam, a printed mask fooled facial recognition at a passport-control gate at Schiphol Airport, they said.


Paper Masks Are Fooling Facial Recognition Software

#artificialintelligence

Facial recognition is being widely embraced as a security tool -- law enforcement and corporations alike are rolling it out to keep tabs on who's accessing airports, stores, and smartphones. As it turns out, the technology is fallible. Researchers with the artificial-intelligence firm Kneron announced that they were able to fool some facial-recognition systems using a printed mask depicting a different person's face. The researchers, who tested systems across three continents, said they fooled payment tablets run by the Chinese companies Alipay and WeChat, as well as a system at a border checkpoint in China. In Amsterdam, a printed mask fooled facial recognition at a passport-control gate at Schiphol Airport, they said.