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New Google Maps feature will show routes to nearest public transport

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google Maps is working on a new feature that will show you how to reach the nearest public transport connection, according to new leaked screenshots. The new Maps filter will let users choose what mode of transportation they will be using at the very beginning of their daily commute, the screenshots show. Once rolled out, the feature will allow commuters to work out their preferred route to various transport connections, such as the train station, when they return to the workplace after the coronavirus pandemic. The screenshots also reveal an option to get more accurate Uber fares using data from Google Maps and a slightly new design for the Maps interface. 'Google Maps is working on route options with "Connections to Public Transit", such as car and transit, bicycle and transit, auto rickshaw, ride service [and] motorcycle and transit,' said Jane Wong, a Hong Kong-based hacker, tech blogger and software engineer, who leaked the screenshots.


Inside the astrology dating app with a feature queer users love

Mashable

Mashable is celebrating Pride Month by exploring the modern LGBTQ world, from the people who make up the community to the spaces where they congregate, both online and off. "I think the funniest thing about this app -- the best thing about this app besides it being an astrology dating app…" said TikTok user @ladygleep, a 23-year-old named Glorianna, "is that while I was filling out my profile, it asked me if'I don't want to see or be seen by straight people.'" Glorianna, a filmmaker and photographer based in Connecticut, pointed out the feature on the astrology dating app NUiT. The app utilizes a similar like/pass model as other dating apps, but also gives users the opportunity to view the other person's birth chart and calculate astrological compatibility. Once users download NUiT they complete their profile, which is partially like that on other apps as it involves uploading photos.


Data from hundreds of thousands of users on dating apps like Herpes Dating were exposed online

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Sexually explicit pictures, audio recordings and private conversations shared in dating apps, such as SugarD and Herpes Dating, have been exposed online. Security researchers discovered unprotected Amazon Web Services'buckets' with over 20 million files linked to hundreds of thousands of users. Although no'personally identifiable information' was visible, experts note that a determined hacker could reveal a user through photos and other available information. It is not known if the data was accessed by anyone else, but the team says there is enough to commit fraud, extortion and viral attacks on the apps' members. Sexual explicit pictures, audio recordings and private conversations belonging to users of dating apps, such as SugarD and Herpes Dating, have been exposed online.


Dating Apps Exposed 845GB of Explicit Photos, Chats, and More

WIRED

It's painfully common for data to be exposed online. But just because it happens so often that doesn't make it any less dangerous. Especially when that data comes from a slew of dating apps that cater to specific groups and interests. Security researchers Noam Rotem and Ran Locar were scanning the open internet on May 24 when they stumbled upon a collection of publicly accessible Amazon Web Services "buckets." Each contained a trove of data from a different specialized dating app, including 3somes, Cougary, Gay Daddy Bear, Xpal, BBW Dating, Casualx, SugarD, Herpes Dating, and GHunt.



The Morning After: Alexa's new 'Drop In' intercom system

Engadget

For what is probably the lightest news you'll read today, Amazon's new feature for Alexa turns any connected devices into walkie-talkies. While they could already easily send messages from one device to another, now you can ask Alexa to "Drop In Everywhere" and get a live line to all the devices in your house, useful for finding out who wants what on their pizza or getting someone to check for a package at the front door. Just… don't activate it by accident? Researchers have combined biometrics from Oura rings with AI prediction models to detect COVID-19 symptoms up to three days early with, they claim, over 90 percent accuracy. It sounds pretty incredible, but the science isn't just about wearing a bit of tech on your finger.


Online dating platforms are set to offer 'digital health passports' to UK singletons

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Online dating giants are set to offer digital health passports to millions of UK singletons to prove they are free of coronavirus. Manchester-based cyber firm VST Enterprises (VSTE), is pioneering technology which it says can be used to safeguard daters when coronavirus restrictions are eased. The company says it has been approached for its digital health passports by several leading dating app companies. Tinder and Grindr are believed to be two of the dating apps that are waiting to launch them. The technology, called'VCode', would enable a doctor or nurse to upload the results of a government-approved Covid-19 test to the digital health passport.


Coronavirus has changed online dating. Here's why some say that's a good thing

PBS NewsHour

When California issued a stay-at-home order back in March to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Dana Angelo, a 33-year-old copywriter at an ad agency in Los Angeles, found herself with more free time. So, out of boredom, she turned to a social activity she could still do from home: She got back on the dating app, Bumble. Angelo said she's been rotating through online dating apps -- she's also tried Tinder and Hinge -- with minimal luck since getting out of a long-term relationship about a year ago, and had recently been taking a break. "You just see the same people on all of them and then it gets kind of depressing," Angelo said. But something surprising happened this time around: She actually met someone she genuinely likes.


Coronavirus has changed online dating. Here's why some say that's a good thing

PBS NewsHour

When California issued a stay-at-home order back in March to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Dana Angelo, a 33-year-old copywriter at an ad agency in Los Angeles, found herself with more free time. So, out of boredom, she turned to a social activity she could still do from home: She got back on the dating app, Bumble. Angelo said she's been rotating through online dating apps -- she's also tried Tinder and Hinge -- with minimal luck since getting out of a long-term relationship about a year ago, and had recently been taking a break. "You just see the same people on all of them and then it gets kind of depressing," Angelo said. But something surprising happened this time around: She actually met someone she genuinely likes.


Futurists predict what your sex life may look like after the pandemic

Mashable

The macro effects of the coronavirus impact are undeniable: Tens of thousands of lives lost, mass unemployment, life seemingly suspended in midair. But the pandemic's impacts have also rippled down to the minutiae of daily life, like social media behavior and messages on dating apps. Uncertainty is now an inescapable presence. As someone who's single, I often toil over what sex and dating will be like "after this is all over," when and if it's ever really over. While no one can know for sure, of course, I decided to ask futurists -- people who stare uncertainty in the face for a living -- for their thoughts.