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A new way to train AI systems could keep them safer from hackers

#artificialintelligence

The context: One of the best unsolved defects of deep knowing is its vulnerability to so-called adversarial attacks. When included to the input of an AI system, these perturbations, apparently random or undetected to the human eye, can make things go totally awry. Stickers tactically put on a stop indication, for instance, can deceive a self-driving automobile into seeing a speed limitation indication for 45 miles per hour, while sticker labels on a roadway can puzzle a Tesla into drifting into the incorrect lane. Safety important: Most adversarial research study concentrates on image acknowledgment systems, however deep-learning-based image restoration systems are susceptible too. This is especially uncomfortable in healthcare, where the latter are typically utilized to rebuild medical images like CT or MRI scans from x-ray information.


Alphabet's Next Billion-Dollar Business: 10 Industries To Watch - CB Insights Research

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Alphabet is using its dominance in the search and advertising spaces -- and its massive size -- to find its next billion-dollar business. From healthcare to smart cities to banking, here are 10 industries the tech giant is targeting. With growing threats from its big tech peers Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, Alphabet's drive to disrupt has become more urgent than ever before. The conglomerate is leveraging the power of its first moats -- search and advertising -- and its massive scale to find its next billion-dollar businesses. To protect its current profits and grow more broadly, Alphabet is edging its way into industries adjacent to the ones where it has already found success and entering new spaces entirely to find opportunities for disruption. Evidence of Alphabet's efforts is showing up in several major industries. For example, the company is using artificial intelligence to understand the causes of diseases like diabetes and cancer and how to treat them. Those learnings feed into community health projects that serve the public, and also help Alphabet's effort to build smart cities. Elsewhere, Alphabet is using its scale to build a better virtual assistant and own the consumer electronics software layer. It's also leveraging that scale to build a new kind of Google Pay-operated checking account. In this report, we examine how Alphabet and its subsidiaries are currently working to disrupt 10 major industries -- from electronics to healthcare to transportation to banking -- and what else might be on the horizon. Within the world of consumer electronics, Alphabet has already found dominance with one product: Android. Mobile operating system market share globally is controlled by the Linux-based OS that Google acquired in 2005 to fend off Microsoft and Windows Mobile. Today, however, Alphabet's consumer electronics strategy is being driven by its work in artificial intelligence. Google is building some of its own hardware under the Made by Google line -- including the Pixel smartphone, the Chromebook, and the Google Home -- but the company is doing more important work on hardware-agnostic software products like Google Assistant (which is even available on iOS).


Don't trust AI until we build systems that earn trust

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To judge from the hype, artificial intelligence is inches away from ripping through the economy and destroying everyone's jobs--save for the AI scientists who build the technology and the baristas and yoga instructors who minister to them. But one critic of that view comes from within the tent of AI itself: Gary Marcus. From an academic background in psychology and neuroscience--rather than computer science--Mr Marcus has long been an AI gadfly. He relishes poking holes in the popular AI technique of deep-learning because of its inability to perform abstractions even as it does an impressive job at pattern-matching. Yet his unease with the state of the art didn't prevent him from advancing the art with his own AI startup, Geometric Intelligence, which he sold to Uber in 2016.


Don't trust AI until we build systems that earn trust

#artificialintelligence

To judge from the hype, artificial intelligence is inches away from ripping through the economy and destroying everyone's jobs--save for the AI scientists who build the technology and the baristas and yoga instructors who minister to them. But one critic of that view comes from within the tent of AI itself: Gary Marcus. From an academic background in psychology and neuroscience--rather than computer science--Mr Marcus has long been an AI gadfly. He relishes poking holes in the popular AI technique of deep-learning because of its inability to perform abstractions even as it does an impressive job at pattern-matching. Yet his unease with the state of the art didn't prevent him from advancing the art with his own AI startup, Geometric Intelligence, which he sold to Uber in 2016.


Machine Learning at the Network Edge: A Survey

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Devices comprising the Internet of Things, such as sensors and small cameras, usually have small memories and limited computational power. The proliferation of such resource-constrained devices in recent years has led to the generation of large quantities of data. These data-producing devices are appealing targets for machine learning applications but struggle to run machine learning algorithms due to their limited computing capability. They typically offload input data to external computing systems (such as cloud servers) for further processing. The results of the machine learning computations are communicated back to the resource-scarce devices, but this worsens latency, leads to increased communication costs, and adds to privacy concerns. Therefore, efforts have been made to place additional computing devices at the edge of the network, i.e close to the IoT devices where the data is generated. Deploying machine learning systems on such edge devices alleviates the above issues by allowing computations to be performed close to the data sources. This survey describes major research efforts where machine learning has been deployed at the edge of computer networks.



What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence ZDNet

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This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, advises CXOs on how to approach AI and ML initiatives, figure out where the data science team fits in, and what algorithms to buy versus build. It depends who you ask. Back in the 1950s, the fathers of the field Minsky and McCarthy, described artificial intelligence as any task performed by a program or a machine that, if a human carried out the same activity, we would say the human had to apply intelligence to accomplish the task. That obviously is a fairly broad definition, which is why you will sometimes see arguments over whether something is truly AI or not. AI systems will typically demonstrate at least some of the following behaviors associated with human intelligence: planning, learning, reasoning, problem solving, knowledge representation, perception, motion, and manipulation and, to a lesser extent, social intelligence and creativity. AI is ubiquitous today, used to recommend what you should buy next online, to understand what you say to virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri, to recognise who and what is in a photo, to spot spam, or detect credit card fraud. AI might be a hot topic but you'll still need to justify those projects.


What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Video: Getting started with artificial intelligence and machine learning It depends who you ask. Back in the 1950s, the fathers of the field Minsky andMcCarthy, described artificial intelligence as any task performed by a program or a machine that, if a human carried out the same activity, we would say the human had to apply intelligence to accomplish the task. That obviously is a fairly broad definition, which is why you will sometimes see arguments over whether something is truly AI or not. AI systems will typically demonstrate at least some of the following behaviors associated with human intelligence: planning, learning, reasoning, problem solving, knowledge representation, perception, motion, and manipulation and, to a lesser extent, social intelligence and creativity. AI is ubiquitous today, used to recommend what you should buy next online, to recognise what you say to virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri, to recognise who and what is in a photo, to spot spam, or detect credit card fraud. At a very high level artificial intelligence can be split into two broad types: narrow AI and general AI. Narrow AI is what we see all around us in computers today: intelligent systems that have been taught or learned how to carry out specific tasks without being explicitly programmed how to do so.


Arguing Machines: Human Supervision of Black Box AI Systems That Make Life-Critical Decisions

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We consider the paradigm of a black box AI system that makes life-critical decisions. We propose an "arguing machines" framework that pairs the primary AI system with a secondary one that is independently trained to perform the same task. We show that disagreement between the two systems, without any knowledge of underlying system design or operation, is sufficient to arbitrarily improve the accuracy of the overall decision pipeline given human supervision over disagreements. We demonstrate this system in two applications: (1) an illustrative example of image classification and (2) on large-scale real-world semi-autonomous driving data. For the first application, we apply this framework to image classification achieving a reduction from 8.0% to 2.8% top-5 error on ImageNet. For the second application, we apply this framework to Tesla Autopilot and demonstrate the ability to predict 90.4% of system disengagements that were labeled by human annotators as challenging and needing human supervision.


27 Incredible Examples Of AI And Machine Learning In Practice

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There are so many amazing ways artificial intelligence and machine learning are used behind the scenes to impact our everyday lives and inform business decisions and optimize operations for some of the world's leading companies. Here are 27 amazing practical examples of AI and machine learning. Using natural language processing, machine learning and advanced analytics, Hello Barbie listens and responds to a child. A microphone on Barbie's necklace records what is said and transmits it to the servers at ToyTalk. There, the recording is analyzed to determine the appropriate response from 8,000 lines of dialogue.