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Future Tense Newsletter: The Four Master Switches

Slate

I reach out to you still contemplating the profundity of what Mark Zuckerberg told his congressional inquisitors on Wednesday: "The space of people connecting with other people is a very large space." So large, it even includes newsletters in your inbox. Three clear winners and one loser emerged from Wednesday's Big Tech hearing in Washington. The winners were Rep. Pramila Jayapal, our new "eviscerator in chief"; Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai's future career as an anger-management therapist; and Tim Wu. When the going gets tough in coming weeks, I will close my eyes and picture the Google CEO soothingly saying "congressman" with infinite patience, as he did at the beginning of all his answers. The more irate the congressional questioner, the more patient, measured, and empathetic his "congressman" sounded.


Facebook will pay $650 million to settle facial recognition privacy lawsuit

Engadget

Facebook will now hand over a total of $650 million to settle a lawsuit over the company's use of facial recognition technology. The social network added $100 million to its initial $550 million settlement, Facebook revealed in court documents reported by Fortune. The lawsuit dates back to 2015, when the company was hit with a class action lawsuit saying Facebook violated an Illinois privacy law that required companies obtain "explicit consent" before collecting biometric data from users. At issue was Facebook's "tag suggestions" feature, which used facial recognition to scan photos and automatically suggest tags when users uploaded new images. The new $650 million settlement comes as officials around the country have pushed for facial recognition bans.


Judge: Facebook's $550 Million Settlement In Facial Recognition Case Is Not Enough

NPR Technology

Facebook in January agreed to a historic $550 million settlement over its face-identifying technology. But now, the federal judge overseeing the case is refusing the accept the deal. Facebook in January agreed to a historic $550 million settlement over its face-identifying technology. But now, the federal judge overseeing the case is refusing the accept the deal. Next week, lawyers for Facebook will be back in court, trying to convince a judge they should be allowed to settle a class action suit that accuses the company of violating users' privacy.


Tinder users still getting banned after showing support for Black Lives Matter

Mashable

A Tinder user in Utah, Jade Goulart, decided recently to use her account to support Black Lives Matter. She added a petition for justice for Breonna Taylor to her bio and wrote, "Instant response if you sign this petition." Goulart said she also added something like, "You mean to tell me you aren't out protesting for human rights? "I felt like something was weird about that," Goulart told Mashable over Twitter DM. "So I looked it up and saw that Tinder had come out and said that they originally were banning accounts for promoting BLM because it was against the'promotional purposes' part of their terms." She read BBC's coverage from early June, in which Tinder explained users were banned for fundraising for Black Lives Matter and related causes because such promotion was against its Community Guidelines. The dating app quickly walked that back, days after people began posting about it on social media, saying it wouldn't ban users for such activity anymore. "We have voiced our support ...



Grindr has removed its controversial ethnicity filters

Mashable

The killing of George Floyd by police officers has spurred not only protests across the United States, but also -- often embarrassing -- responses from brands. The queer dating app Grindr offered its own statement on Twitter and Instagram on Monday, coinciding with the first day of Pride Month. They will take action including not only donating to both BLM and the Marsha P. Johnson Institute, but also by removing their ethnicity filters for their next app release: We will not be silent. "We will continue to fight racism on Grindr," the statement said, "both through dialogue with our community and zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech on our platform." A Grindr spokesperson told Mashable that racism has no place in their community.


Dating app Grindr removes 'ethnicity filter' allowing users to search for potential partners by race

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Dating app Grindr has said it will remove its'ethnicity filter' that allows users to search potential matches by race. Singletons prepared to pay £12.99-a-month for the'premium' service are currently able to sort users based on their ethnicity, weight, height, and other characteristics. But less than 24 hours after its tweet supporting'Black Lives Matter' received widespread condemnation over the filter, the company has said it will delete it. Protests have rocked the US for six days following the death of George Floyd, who was filmed gasping'I can't breathe' as an officer knelt on his neck in Logan County, West Virginia. Writing on Twitter, the app said: 'As part of our commitment to (Black Lives Matter), we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.


Grindr will finally remove the app's ethnicity filter

Engadget

Dating app Grindr will finally remove its ethnicity filter, following years of criticism culminating in accusations of hypocrisy regarding the company's stance on #BlackLivesMatter. The app currently lets users filter potential matches based on age, height, weight and ethnicity, but the company -- which says it has a "zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech" -- has confirmed the ethnicity filter will be removed from the next version of the app. The change, which coincides with the start of Pride month, appears to have been catalyzed by responses to a tweet in which Grindr said, "Demand justice. One response to the tweet said "remove the ethnicity filter" and was subsequently retweeted 1,000 times. Grindr later deleted its original tweet, replacing it with the below.


25 technologies that have changed the world

#artificialintelligence

You may even be using one to read this article. Wi-Fi has become essential to our personal and professional lives. The smartphone and the internet we use today wouldn't have been possible without wireless communication technologies such as Wi-Fi. In 1995 if you wanted to "surf" the internet at home, you had to chain yourself to a network cable like it was an extension cord. In 1997, Wi-Fi was invented and released for consumer use.


Utah man stabbed Tinder date to death hours after meeting her, police say

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A Utah man was arrested on Sunday after he called police claiming he had killed a woman he met on Tinder. Ethan Hunsaker, 24, surrendered to officers from the Layton Police Department and was charged with first-degree murder. He told police he had met the 25-year-old victim late Saturday night after connecting on the dating app.