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10 Ways AI Is Improving New Product Development

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From startups to enterprises racing to get new products launched, AI and machine learning (ML) are making solid contributions to accelerating new product development. There are 15,400 job positions for DevOps and product development engineers with AI and machine learning today on Indeed, LinkedIn and Monster combined. Capgemini predicts the size of the connected products market will range between $519B to $685B this year with AI and ML-enabled services revenue models becoming commonplace. Rapid advances in AI-based apps, products and services will also force the consolidation of the IoT platform market. The IoT platform providers concentrating on business challenges in vertical markets stand the best chance of surviving the coming IoT platform shakeout.


Reducing bias in AI-based financial services

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Artificial intelligence (AI) presents an opportunity to transform how we allocate credit and risk, and to create fairer, more inclusive systems. AI's ability to avoid the traditional credit reporting and scoring system that helps perpetuate existing bias makes it a rare, if not unique, opportunity to alter the status quo. However, AI can easily go in the other direction to exacerbate existing bias, creating cycles that reinforce biased credit allocation while making discrimination in lending even harder to find. Will we unlock the positive, worsen the negative, or maintain the status quo by embracing new technology? This paper proposes a framework to evaluate the impact of AI in consumer lending. The goal is to incorporate new data and harness AI to expand credit to consumers who need it on better terms than are currently provided. It builds on our existing system's dual goals of pricing financial services based on the true risk the individual consumer poses while aiming to prevent discrimination (e.g., race, gender, DNA, marital status, etc.).


Europe and AI: Leading, Lagging Behind, or Carving Its Own Way?

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For its AI ecosystem to thrive, Europe needs to find a way to protect its research base, encourage governments to be early adopters, foster its startup ecosystem, expand international links, and develop AI technologies as well as leverage their use efficiently.


How AI can empower communities and strengthen democracy

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Each Fourth of July for the past five years I've written about AI with the potential to positively impact democratic societies. I return to this question with the hope of shining a light on technology that can strengthen communities, protect privacy and freedoms, or otherwise support the public good. This series is grounded in the principle that artificial intelligence can is capable of not just value extraction, but individual and societal empowerment. While AI solutions often propagate bias, they can also be used to detect that bias. As Dr. Safiya Noble has pointed out, artificial intelligence is one of the critical human rights issues of our lifetimes.


Ethical AI and the importance of guidelines for algorithms -- explained

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In October, Amazon had to discontinue an artificial intelligence–powered recruiting tool after it discovered the system was biased against female applicants. In 2016, a ProPublica investigation revealed a recidivism assessment tool that used machine learning was biased against black defendants. More recently, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development sued Facebook because its ad-serving algorithms enabled advertisers to discriminate based on characteristics like gender and race. And Google refrained from renewing its AI contract with the Department of Defense after employees raised ethical concerns. Those are just a few of the many ethical controversies surrounding artificial intelligence algorithms in the past few years.


Global Big Data Conference

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In 1906, in response to shocking reports about the disgusting conditions in U.S. meat-packing facilities, Congress created the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure safe and sanitary food production. In 1934, in the wake of the worst stock market crash in U.S. history, Congress created the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to regulate capital markets. In 1970, as the nation became increasingly alarmed about the deterioration of the natural environment, Congress created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to ensure cleaner skies and waters. When an entire field begins to create a broad set of challenges for the public, demanding thoughtful regulation, a proven governmental approach is to create a federal agency focused specifically on engaging with and managing that field. The time has come to create a federal agency for artificial intelligence.


Here Is How The United States Should Regulate Artificial Intelligence

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The U.S. Congress should create a federal agency for artificial intelligence. In 1906, in response to shocking reports about the disgusting conditions in U.S. meat-packing facilities, Congress created the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure safe and sanitary food production. In 1934, in the wake of the worst stock market crash in U.S. history, Congress created the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to regulate capital markets. In 1970, as the nation became increasingly alarmed about the deterioration of the natural environment, Congress created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to ensure cleaner skies and waters. When an entire field begins to create a broad set of challenges for the public, demanding thoughtful regulation, a proven governmental approach is to create a federal agency focused specifically on engaging with and managing that field.


Abolish the #TechToPrisonPipeline

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The authors of the Harrisburg University study make explicit their desire to provide "a significant advantage for law enforcement agencies and other intelligence agencies to prevent crime" as a co-author and former NYPD police officer outlined in the original press release.[38] At a time when the legitimacy of the carceral state, and policing in particular, is being challenged on fundamental grounds in the United States, there is high demand in law enforcement for research of this nature, research which erases historical violence and manufactures fear through the so-called prediction of criminality. Publishers and funding agencies serve a crucial role in feeding this ravenous maw by providing platforms and incentives for such research. The circulation of this work by a major publisher like Springer would represent a significant step towards the legitimation and application of repeatedly debunked, socially harmful research in the real world. To reiterate our demands, the review committee must publicly rescind the offer for publication of this specific study, along with an explanation of the criteria used to evaluate it. Springer must issue a statement condemning the use of criminal justice statistics to predict criminality and acknowledging their role in incentivizing such harmful scholarship in the past. Finally, all publishers must refrain from publishing similar studies in the future.


Ethical AI and the importance of guidelines for algorithms -- explained – Ranzware Tech NEWS

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In October, Amazon had to discontinue an artificial intelligence–powered recruiting tool after it discovered the system was biased against female applicants. In 2016, a ProPublica investigation revealed a recidivism assessment tool that used machine learning was biased against black defendants. More recently, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development sued Facebook because its ad-serving algorithms enabled advertisers to discriminate based on characteristics like gender and race. And Google refrained from renewing its AI contract with the Department of Defense after employees raised ethical concerns. Those are just a few of the many ethical controversies surrounding artificial intelligence algorithms in the past few years.


Experts Predict Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Warfare

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Army Lt. Gen. John N.T. ''Jack'' Shanahan spoke remotely from the Pentagon yesterday with Dave Deptula, dean of the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. ''It is my conviction and deep passion that AI will transform the character of warfare in the Department of Defense in the course of the next 20 years,'' Shanahan said. ''There is no part of the department that will not be impacted by this, from the back office to the battlefield, from under sea to cyberspace and outer space, and all points in between.'' Artificial intelligence, often called AI, has been happening in commercial industry, but that effort only started in earnest in the department about 10 years ago, he noted, but ''we've been stuck in first gear in terms of fielding.'' DOD has long struggled with how to take the world's best research and development and field it at speed and at scale, he added.