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Consumers Warm Up to Facial Recognition to Keep Them Safe, but for Marketing and Advertising, No Thanks

#artificialintelligence

As facial recognition systems become increasingly accurate, more governments and law enforcement organizations are tapping them to verify people's identities, nab criminals and keep transactions secure. In recent months, France's government announced a nationwide facial recognition ID program, a UK court ruled that live facial recognition doesn't violate privacy rights and research revealed that the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency and the FBI are using facial recognition to apprehend undocumented immigrants. Most of this activity is undertaken in the name of safety and security, but it is also raising major red flags among privacy advocates. They argue that the technology--which can scan and identify faces without consent in crowded streets, retail stores and sports stadiums--is predatory and invasive. Among consumers, the jury is still out.


NIST Face Recognition Study Finds That Algorithms Vary Greatly, Biases Tend to Be Regional

#artificialintelligence

The use of face recognition software by governments is a current topic of controversy around the globe. The world's major powers, primarily the United States and China, have made major advances in both development and deployment of this technology in the past decade. Both the US and China have been exporting this technology to other countries. The rapid spread of facial recognition systems has alarmed privacy advocates concerned about the increased ability of governments to profile and track people, as well as private companies like Facebook tying it to intimately detailed personal profiles. A recent study by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that examines facial recognition software vendors has found that there is definitely some merit to claims of racial bias and poor levels of accuracy in specific demographics.


Is Artificial Intelligence Racial Bias Being Suppressed? - ReadWrite

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning are used to power a variety of important modern software technologies. AI also powers the facial recognition software commonly used by law enforcement, landlords, and private citizens. Of all the uses for AI-powered software, facial recognition is a big deal. Security teams from large buildings that rely on video surveillance – like schools and airports – can benefit greatly from this technology. An AI algorithm has the potential to detect a known criminal or an unauthorized person on the property.


Is Artificial Intelligence Racial Bias Being Suppressed? - ReadWrite

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning are used to power a variety of important modern software technologies. AI also powers the facial recognition software commonly used by law enforcement, landlords, and private citizens. Of all the uses for AI-powered software, facial recognition is a big deal. Security teams from large buildings that rely on video surveillance – like schools and airports – can benefit greatly from this technology. An AI algorithm has the potential to detect a known criminal or an unauthorized person on the property.


California passes bill to ban the use of facial recognition recordings gathered by cop body cams

Daily Mail - Science & tech

California lawmakers have passed a bill that bans law enforcement from using facial recognition technology gathered by body cameras – in a bid to end privacy abuse. The bill, signed by Governor Gavin Newsom, will go into effect in 2020 and last for three years. The motion also prohibits cops from using biometric surveillance including other forms of identification that can be capture from body camera videos. California lawmakers have passed a bill that bans law enforcement from using facial recognition technology gathered by body cameras – in a bid to end privacy abuse. The bill is first of its kind in the US and recognizes that'the use of facial recognition and other biometric surveillance is the functional equivalent of requiring every person to show a personal photo identification card at all times in violation of recognized constitutional rights.


Facial recognition: ten reasons you should be worried about the technology

#artificialintelligence

Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It's common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centers. The rapid growth of this technology has triggered a much-needed debate. Activists, politicians, academics and even police forces are expressing serious concerns over the impact facial recognition could have on a political culture based on rights and democracy.


Facial recognition: ten reasons you should be worried about the technology

#artificialintelligence

Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It's common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centres. The rapid growth of this technology has triggered a much-needed debate. Activists, politicians, academics and even police forces are expressing serious concerns over the impact facial recognition could have on a political culture based on rights and democracy.


Facial recognition scanners are already at some US airports. Here's what to know

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Many airports hope to start using biometric scanners in lieu of passports to identify travelers. Buzz60's Tony Spitz has the details. The next time you go to the airport you might notice something different as part of the security process: A machine scanning your face to verify your identity. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domestic airports to better streamline security. But how does the process work?


Amazon's AI can now detect fear: Rekognition software can better read emotions and predict age

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Amazon says its increasingly popular facial recognition software has learned a few new tricks, including the ability to discern when someone is scared. The software, called'Rekognition', has added'fear' to its list of detectable emotions which already includes'Happy', 'Sad', 'Angry', 'Surprised', 'Disgusted', 'Calm' and'Confused,' said Amazon in an announcement earlier this week. In addition to its emotion capabilities, Amazon says its has also improved Rekognition's ability to identify gender and age more accurately. Amazon's facial recognition software can now detect'fear' and better glean age and gender according to an announcement by the company. The improved age features offer smaller age ranges across the spectrum and also more accurate range predictions, said the company.


ICE Uses Facial Recognition To Sift State Driver's License Records, Researchers Say

NPR Technology

In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents mine millions of driver's license photos for possible facial recognition matches -- and some of those efforts target undocumented immigrants who have legally obtained driver's licenses, according to researchers at Georgetown University Law Center, which obtained documents related to the searches.