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White House advisory council calls on U.S. to increase AI funding to $10 billion by 2030

#artificialintelligence

Earlier this week, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) released a report outlining what it believes must happen for the U.S. to advance "industries of the future." Several of the committee's suggestions touched on the field of AI as it relates to federal, state, and private-sector partnerships, as well as departmental budgetary considerations. In particular, the report recommends that the U.S. grow nondefense federal investments in AI by 10 times over the next 10 years and for the federal government to create national AI "testbeds," expanding the National Science Foundation's (NSF) AI Institutes with at least one AI Institute in each state and creating a "National AI Consortia" to share capabilities, data, and resources. Loosely, PCAST -- which lives in the Office of Science and Technology -- provides advice to the president on science and technology policy. In the report, the committee argues the U.S. will need to boost AI R&D investments from $1 billion a year in 2020 to $10 billion a year by 2030 in order to remain competitive.


NASA updates policies to protect the moon and Mars from human germs that may hitchhike on astronauts

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As NASA gears up to send humans to the moon and Mars it is also working on new advances to protect the space terrains from human germs. The American space agency released updates to its Planetary Protection Policies that provide new requirements for both astronaut and robotic missions. The added policies note that no biological matter is left on or around the moon, along with humans are to not contaminate any part of Mars with biological materials or return to Earth with germs from the Red Planet. The first woman and next man are set to head to the moon in 2024 and the first crewed mission to Mars is planned for the 2030s – and as early as 2035. The added policies note that no biological matter is left on or around the moon.


Preparing data for time series analysis

#artificialintelligence

TS may look like a simple data object and easy to deal with, but the reality is that for someone new it can be a daunting task just to prepare the dataset before the actual fun stuff can begin. Every single time series (TS) data is loaded with information; and time series analysis (TSA) is the process of unpacking all of that. However, to unlock this potential, data needs to be prepared and formatted appropriately before putting it through the analytics pipeline. TS may look like a simple data object and easy to deal with, but the reality is that for someone new it can be a daunting task just to prepare the dataset before the actual fun stuff can begin. So in this article we will talk about some simple tips and tricks for getting the analysis-ready data to potentially save many hours of one's productive time.


'Deadly Premonition 2' is a fantastic mystery wrapped up in an ugly game

Mashable

Deadly Premonition 2: A Blessing in Disguise is a conflicting experience. On one hand, the game's narrative revolving around the mysterious murder of a young woman in a small Louisiana town is deeply intriguing with its constant twists and surprises that spin an ever-widening web of sadism, death, and terror until the very end. On the other hand, the game looks and plays like shit. As the sequel to perhaps the most critically polarizing game of all time, 2010's Deadly Premonition, this duality fits like a glove and developer SWERY somehow manages to fulfill this game's unique expectations. Both games center around mysteries with similar beginnings that only get more interesting as they go on, but just like its sequel, the first game is also pretty awful to look at, even for 10 years ago. That earlier game follows FBI Special Agent Francis York Morgan as he works to solve a murder mystery in the small, rural town Greenvale, Wash. in the mid-2000s. Morgan runs into paranormal threats and wild characters as he divines answers from cups of coffee and frequently converses and consults with a voice in his head named Zach.


NASA wants to protect Moon and Mars from human contamination

Engadget

NASA wants to make sure we don't unknowingly take organisms or other contaminants from Earth to other worlds (and vice-versa) when humans start exploring space beyond Low Earth Orbit. In a tweet, NASA Administrator Jim Brindestine has announced that the agency has updated its policies to reflect that commitment ahead of the upcoming Artemis missions. "We will protect scientific discoveries and the Earth's environment, while enabling dynamic human exploration and commercial innovation on the Moon and Mars," he wrote. While the space agency has been sending rovers and other unmanned spacecraft to the Moon and Mars, it's concerned about the biological contaminants associated with human presence. If we unknowingly take contaminants to other worlds when we start human exploration, we risk compromising the search for extraterrestrial life. At the same time, NASA wants to ensure its crewed missions don't cause adverse changes to Earth's environment with the introduction of contaminants from outer space.


Integrating Artificial Intelligence in Treatment Planning

#artificialintelligence

At the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting, new artificial intelligence (AI) software to assist with radiotherapy treatment planning systems was highlighted. The goal of the AI-based systems is to save staff time, while still allowing clinicians to do the final patient review. RaySearch demonstrated a new U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared machine learning treatment planning system. The RaySearch RayStation machine learning algorithm is being used clinically by University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, where it was rolled out over several months in late-2019. Medical physicist Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., was involved in this rollout and helped conduct a study, showing the automated plans and traditionally made plans to radiation oncologists to get valuable feedback.


New US visa rule leaves Indian, Chinese students in panic

Al Jazeera

New York, United States - The Trump administration's abrupt changes to foreign student visa rules have upended the plans of more than a million international students currently enrolled in institutions across the United States, with many fearing for their future. The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Monday announced that it would strip the visa of foreign students whose entire courses have moved online due to the coronavirus pandemic, with critics calling the move "xenophobic" and part of President Donald Trump's hardline immigration policy. The directive by ICE's Student and Exchange Visitor Program is likely to hit hundreds of thousands of students, particularly from Asian countries, hard, as they will have to leave the US or face deportation. Many of them might face the prospect of distance learning from the other side of the world, where time zones, unreliable internet connections, and internet bans would make completing their degree programmes difficult - if not impossible. According to research conducted by ICE, nearly 80 percent of all international students in the US are from Asia, with China and India accounting for nearly half of them.


Europe and AI: Leading, Lagging Behind, or Carving Its Own Way?

#artificialintelligence

For its AI ecosystem to thrive, Europe needs to find a way to protect its research base, encourage governments to be early adopters, foster its startup ecosystem, expand international links, and develop AI technologies as well as leverage their use efficiently.


Trade groups offering $100,000 reward after noose found at Facebook data center

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The FBI and Justice Department are assisting the Altoona Police Department's investigation after a noose was found last month at a work site on the Facebook Data Center property in Altoona, Iowa. Altoona police officials say they contacted the FBI on June 19, the day the noose was found. The date coincided with Juneteenth, the annual holiday celebrating the end of slavery. Interviews are still being conducted in the investigation, according to Altoona Police Department Public Information Officer Alyssa Wilson. While federal investigators were already involved with the incident, as of Thursday, all information in the case will be filtered through the FBI's Omaha office.


What I Learned from Losing $200 Million - Issue 87: Risk

Nautilus

I'd lost almost $200 million in October. It was 2008, after the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy. Banks were failing left and right. I worked at a major investment bank, and while I didn't think the disastrous deal I'd done would cause its collapse, my losses were quickly decimating its commodities profits for the year, along with the potential pay of my more profitable colleagues. I thought my career could be over. I'd already started to feel those other traders and salespeople keeping their distance, as if I'd contracted a disease. My eyes started to fill from a sudden wash of gratitude and relief that came, I think, from no longer being alone. I landed in London on the morning of November 4, having flown overnight from New York. I was a derivatives trader, but also the supervisor of the bank's oil options trading team, about a dozen guys split between Singapore, London, and New York.