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Preparing data for time series analysis

#artificialintelligence

TS may look like a simple data object and easy to deal with, but the reality is that for someone new it can be a daunting task just to prepare the dataset before the actual fun stuff can begin. Every single time series (TS) data is loaded with information; and time series analysis (TSA) is the process of unpacking all of that. However, to unlock this potential, data needs to be prepared and formatted appropriately before putting it through the analytics pipeline. TS may look like a simple data object and easy to deal with, but the reality is that for someone new it can be a daunting task just to prepare the dataset before the actual fun stuff can begin. So in this article we will talk about some simple tips and tricks for getting the analysis-ready data to potentially save many hours of one's productive time.


'Deadly Premonition 2' is a fantastic mystery wrapped up in an ugly game

Mashable

Deadly Premonition 2: A Blessing in Disguise is a conflicting experience. On one hand, the game's narrative revolving around the mysterious murder of a young woman in a small Louisiana town is deeply intriguing with its constant twists and surprises that spin an ever-widening web of sadism, death, and terror until the very end. On the other hand, the game looks and plays like shit. As the sequel to perhaps the most critically polarizing game of all time, 2010's Deadly Premonition, this duality fits like a glove and developer SWERY somehow manages to fulfill this game's unique expectations. Both games center around mysteries with similar beginnings that only get more interesting as they go on, but just like its sequel, the first game is also pretty awful to look at, even for 10 years ago. That earlier game follows FBI Special Agent Francis York Morgan as he works to solve a murder mystery in the small, rural town Greenvale, Wash. in the mid-2000s. Morgan runs into paranormal threats and wild characters as he divines answers from cups of coffee and frequently converses and consults with a voice in his head named Zach.


NASA wants to protect Moon and Mars from human contamination

Engadget

NASA wants to make sure we don't unknowingly take organisms or other contaminants from Earth to other worlds (and vice-versa) when humans start exploring space beyond Low Earth Orbit. In a tweet, NASA Administrator Jim Brindestine has announced that the agency has updated its policies to reflect that commitment ahead of the upcoming Artemis missions. "We will protect scientific discoveries and the Earth's environment, while enabling dynamic human exploration and commercial innovation on the Moon and Mars," he wrote. While the space agency has been sending rovers and other unmanned spacecraft to the Moon and Mars, it's concerned about the biological contaminants associated with human presence. If we unknowingly take contaminants to other worlds when we start human exploration, we risk compromising the search for extraterrestrial life. At the same time, NASA wants to ensure its crewed missions don't cause adverse changes to Earth's environment with the introduction of contaminants from outer space.


Integrating Artificial Intelligence in Treatment Planning

#artificialintelligence

At the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting, new artificial intelligence (AI) software to assist with radiotherapy treatment planning systems was highlighted. The goal of the AI-based systems is to save staff time, while still allowing clinicians to do the final patient review. RaySearch demonstrated a new U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared machine learning treatment planning system. The RaySearch RayStation machine learning algorithm is being used clinically by University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, where it was rolled out over several months in late-2019. Medical physicist Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., was involved in this rollout and helped conduct a study, showing the automated plans and traditionally made plans to radiation oncologists to get valuable feedback.


New US visa rule leaves Indian, Chinese students in panic

Al Jazeera

New York, United States - The Trump administration's abrupt changes to foreign student visa rules have upended the plans of more than a million international students currently enrolled in institutions across the United States, with many fearing for their future. The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Monday announced that it would strip the visa of foreign students whose entire courses have moved online due to the coronavirus pandemic, with critics calling the move "xenophobic" and part of President Donald Trump's hardline immigration policy. The directive by ICE's Student and Exchange Visitor Program is likely to hit hundreds of thousands of students, particularly from Asian countries, hard, as they will have to leave the US or face deportation. Many of them might face the prospect of distance learning from the other side of the world, where time zones, unreliable internet connections, and internet bans would make completing their degree programmes difficult - if not impossible. According to research conducted by ICE, nearly 80 percent of all international students in the US are from Asia, with China and India accounting for nearly half of them.


Europe and AI: Leading, Lagging Behind, or Carving Its Own Way?

#artificialintelligence

For its AI ecosystem to thrive, Europe needs to find a way to protect its research base, encourage governments to be early adopters, foster its startup ecosystem, expand international links, and develop AI technologies as well as leverage their use efficiently.


Trade groups offering $100,000 reward after noose found at Facebook data center

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The FBI and Justice Department are assisting the Altoona Police Department's investigation after a noose was found last month at a work site on the Facebook Data Center property in Altoona, Iowa. Altoona police officials say they contacted the FBI on June 19, the day the noose was found. The date coincided with Juneteenth, the annual holiday celebrating the end of slavery. Interviews are still being conducted in the investigation, according to Altoona Police Department Public Information Officer Alyssa Wilson. While federal investigators were already involved with the incident, as of Thursday, all information in the case will be filtered through the FBI's Omaha office.


What I Learned from Losing $200 Million - Issue 87: Risk

Nautilus

I'd lost almost $200 million in October. It was 2008, after the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy. Banks were failing left and right. I worked at a major investment bank, and while I didn't think the disastrous deal I'd done would cause its collapse, my losses were quickly decimating its commodities profits for the year, along with the potential pay of my more profitable colleagues. I thought my career could be over. I'd already started to feel those other traders and salespeople keeping their distance, as if I'd contracted a disease. My eyes started to fill from a sudden wash of gratitude and relief that came, I think, from no longer being alone. I landed in London on the morning of November 4, having flown overnight from New York. I was a derivatives trader, but also the supervisor of the bank's oil options trading team, about a dozen guys split between Singapore, London, and New York.


Pentagon AI center shifts focus to joint war-fighting operations

#artificialintelligence

The Pentagon's artificial intelligence hub is shifting its focus to enabling joint war-fighting operations, developing artificial intelligence tools that will be integrated into the Department of Defense's Joint All-Domain Command and Control efforts. "As we have matured, we are now devoting special focus on our joint war-fighting operation and its mission initiative, which is focused on the priorities of the National Defense Strategy and its goal of preserving America's military and technological advantages over our strategic competitors," Nand Mulchandani, acting director of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, told reporters July 8. "The AI capabilities JAIC is developing as part of the joint war-fighting operations mission initiative will use mature AI technology to create a decisive advantage for the American war fighter." Lt. Gen. Jack Shanahan said May 21 that the JAIC needs the authority to buy its own artificial intelligence technology in order to move fast. That marks a significant change from where JAIC stood more than a year ago, when the organization was still being stood up with a focus on using AI for efforts like predictive maintenance. That transformation appears to be driven by the DoD's focus on developing JADC2, a system of systems approach that will connect sensors to shooters in near-real time. "JADC2 is not a single product.


Immigrants help make America great

Science

I am a scientist. I am an American. And I am the product of special expert visas and chain migration—among the many types of legal immigration into the United States. On 22 June, President Trump issued a proclamation that temporarily restricts many types of legal immigration into the country, including that of scientists and students. This will make America neither greater nor safer—rather, it could make America less so. The administration claims that these restrictions are necessitated by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak to prevent threats to American workers. This reasoning is flawed for science and engineering, where immigrants are critical to achieving advances and harnessing the resulting economic opportunity for all Americans. For decades, the United States has inspired both immigrants and nonimmigrants to make substantial contributions to science and technology that benefit everyone. Preventing highly skilled scientists and postdocs from entering the United States directly threatens this enterprise. My uncle, a geologist, came to the United States in the 1960s to work at NASA. He then taught at Appalachian State University in North Carolina and later served as lead geochemist for the state of California. He sponsored my father to come to America in 1968. Leaving Mumbai, a city of millions, and arriving in Hickory, a town of thousands in North Carolina, my father came home to a place he had never been before. My parents worked in furniture factories and textile mills to put us though college and ensure we had opportunities. Today, my sister works at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and I have the privilege of leading the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science ). We exist because of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 and our parents' belief in the vision of the United States as a shining city on a hill. My family's story is repeated by thousands of American scientists. These stories include uncertainty when an immigrant's status in America is in question. This uncertainty causes stress and the possibility that immigrants will leave and take their skills, talents, and humanity elsewhere. For the successful, these stories culminate with relief, celebration, and the pride of becoming a naturalized citizen. As President Reagan said, the United States is the one place in the world where “anybody from any corner of the world can come…to live and become an American.” Naturalized citizens love the United States deeply because they chose to be American. They and other immigrants make huge contributions to science and engineering. According to the National Science Foundation, more than 50% of postdocs and 28% of science and engineering faculty in the United States are immigrants. Of the Nobel Prizes in chemistry, medicine, and physics awarded to Americans since 2000, 38% were awarded to immigrants to the United States. I don't know the number of prizes given to second-generation Americans but Steven Chu—current chair of the AAAS Board of Directors—is among them. The incredible achievements of the American scientific enterprise speak volumes about the vision and forethought of the American people who have worked to create a more perfect union. Suspending legal immigration is self-defeating and breaks a model that is so successful that other nations are copying it. As Thomas Donohue, chief executive officer of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said regarding the administration's proclamation, “Putting up a ‘not welcome’ sign for engineers, executives, IT experts, doctors, nurses, and other workers won't help our country, it will hold us back. Restrictive changes to our nation's immigration system will push investment and economic activity abroad, slow growth, and reduce job creation.” To develop treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, cure cancers, go to Mars, understand the fundamental laws of the universe and human behavior, develop artificial intelligence, and build a better future, we need the brain power of the descendants of Native Americans, Pilgrims, Founding Mothers and Fathers, Enslaved People, Ellis Island arrivals, and immigrants from everywhere. The United States has thrived as a crossroads where people are joined together by ideas and contribute by choice to the freedom and opportunity provided by this wonderful, inspiring, and flawed country that is always striving to live up to its aspirations. Scientists, look around your labs and offices. Think about your collaborations and friendships. We must ensure that this “temporary” restriction on legal immigration does not become permanent. Now is the time to speak up for your immigrant colleagues and for America.