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A new AI 'Super Nurse' monitors patients in Israeli hospital

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Able to monitor multiple patients in separate rooms simultaneously; staying on top of their blood pressure, pulse and vital signs; and spotting signs of deterioration even before the patients feel it themselves. This medical superhero is not human, but rather a product of artificial intelligence, advanced software algorithms, sensors and cameras. And it's being assembled right now at Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. The creation of an AI-powered "super nurse" is the result of a decade of steady work by Ahuva Weiss-Meilik and her team in the hospital's I-Medata center. "Our doctors and nurses can't be everywhere," Weiss-Meilik tells ISRAEL21c.


Harvard: Israel's MedAware could save US health system millions per year

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Technology developed by Israel's MedAware could potentially save the United States health system $800 million annually by preventing medication errors, based on a study published earlier this week in the Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.MedAware developed an AI-based patient safety solution. The new study that was conducted by two Harvard doctors validates both the significant clinical impact and anticipated ROI of MedAware's machine learning-enabled clinical decision support platform designed to prevent medication-related errors and risks.MedAware uses AI methods similar to those used in the finance sector to stop fraud, by identifying "outliers" from a trend or practice in order to recognize suspicious or erroneous transactions. Most other electronic health record alert systems are rule based.In the US alone, prescription drug errors result in "substantial morbidity, mortality and excess health care costs estimated at more than $20 billion annually in the United States," according to Dr. Ronen Rozenblum, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and director of business development for patient safety research and practice at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Rozenblum was the study's lead author, along with Harvard professor Dr. David Bates. Rozenblum, an Israeli who has been living in Boston for more than a decade, has been testing MedAware for the past five years.


Geisinger-AI vendor aim to reduce adverse events, avoid readmissions

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Israel-based Medial EarlySign and Geisinger Health System have partnered to apply advanced artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to Medicare claims data to predict and improve patient outcomes. An EarlySign-Geisinger proposal has been selected as one of 25 participants to advance to Stage 1 of a technology challenge from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to accelerate the development of AI and machine learning solutions for healthcare. "Approximately 4.3 million hospital readmissions occur each year in the U.S., costing more than $60 billion, with preventable adverse patient events creating additional clinical and financial burdens for both patients and healthcare systems," says David Vawdrey, Geisinger's chief data informatics officer. "Together with our partner EarlySign, we have forged a dynamic team that is rapidly developing novel solutions to achieve the Quadruple Aim of improving the patient experience of care, improving the health of populations, reducing cost and improving clinical care provider satisfaction," adds Vawdrey. The AI vendor and Danville, Penn.-based regional healthcare provider intend to develop models that predict unplanned hospital and skilled nursing facility admissions within 30 days of discharge and adverse events such as respiratory failure, postoperative pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis, as well as postoperative sepsis before they occur.


How Israel Turned Decades Of Medical Data Into Digital Health Gold

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All over the world, healthcare systems are struggling to provide the service their patients demand while also working within the legal and budgetary constraints set by governments or other institutions like insurance companies and hospitals. Digitization of medical records and new medical technologies have yet to touch large swathes of the world's medical institutions. In many countries, because of differences in the way records are kept, healthcare services and organizations are unable to "talk" to each other and cannot share data. That makes for inefficiency; if data cannot be shared between institutions, things as basic as blood tests need to be repeated each time a patient goes to a different doctor or institution. Israel's health care system, although consistently highly rated in international surveys, suffers from the same infrastructure issues: hospitals can be overcrowded, and non-critical patients sometimes wait for operations.


Q&A: John Halamka on worldwide trends in AI, blockchain, cloud and more

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Longtime Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Chief Information Officer Dr. John Halamka left that role six months ago after more than two decades – during which time he also became one of the most vocal health information technology champions and visible thought leaders during a pivotal time of IT uptake. Halamka has been traveling the world recently – more than 400,000 miles this year, he says – from Europe to Israel to Africa to China, back to his Sherborn, Massachusetts-based Unity Farm Sanctuary for a quick visit with Dudley, his shaggy Scottish Highland Bull, and then out again to explore the newest global trends in leading-edge digital health. Halamka will keynote the ConVerge2Xcelerate event in Boston on October 15, hosted by Blockchain in Healthcare Today – where he is editor-in-chief – and co-presented as part of the preconference activities of the Connected Health Conference. We caught up with him recently at another Boston event and asked him about what he's seeing on his travels. You were CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess for so long – twenty two years. How has your newish gig, as International Healthcare Innovation Professor, been going? A. That's my academic title, my Harvard Medical School title, and that was three years ago. But the official transition from CIO, a hospital based-title, was March 1, 2019. That's when the merger of Beth Israel and Lahey came together, and the CEO and I talked about: How do you create innovation? So what is next with healthcare innovation?


Healthy.io raises $60 million to help patients complete urine tests on their phone

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Roughly six years ago, former Israel chief technology officer Yonatan Adiri cofounded Healthy.io, a digital health care startup leveraging AI to bring professional-grade medical imaging to the homes of those with chronic kidney disease. Its 10-parameter digital testing kit -- Dip.io -- enables patients to collect and analyze urine samples with nothing more than a smartphone app, a dip stick, and a color-coded slide. It's taken off like wildfire. Following on the heels of an $18 million series B raise in February, Healthy.io CEO Adiri said the fresh capital, which brings Healthy.io's total raised to about $90 million, will accelerate Healthy.io's


5 Technologies Bringing Healthcare Systems into the Future

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If you think you've got a bad case of the travel bug, get this: Dr. John Halamka travels 400,000 miles a year. Halamka is chief information officer at Harvard's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a professor at Harvard Medical School, and a practicing emergency physician. In a talk at Singularity University's Exponential Medicine last week, Halamka shared what he sees as the biggest healthcare problems the world is facing, and the most promising technological solutions from a systems perspective. "In traveling 400,000 miles you get to see lots of different cultures and lots of different people," he said. "And the problems are really the same all over the world. Maybe the cultural context is different or the infrastructure is different, but the problems are very similar."


Amazon Partners With Harvard To Leverage AI, Machine Learning For Better Workflow

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Amazon has extended a grant valued at $2 million to Harvard Medical School so researchers can experiment with machine learning and AI to streamline clinical workflow, Bloomberg reported March 4. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center started purchasing Amazon's cloud services in 2016 in an effort to ensure the hospital's data remained safe and accessible in the case of an emergency, according to Bloomberg. Three years later, Amazon's Web Services unit is working with Beth Israel to make day-to-day tasks like patient scheduling and finding paperwork more cost-effective and efficient. It's well-known that scientists hope to leverage AI and machine learning for better-quality care and quicker, more accurate diagnoses, but Taha Kass-Hout, the senior leader for healthcare and AI at Amazon, said Beth Israel will first focus on alleviating time-consuming manual work so physicians and their staff can better focus on quality.


Amazon fuels Harvard hospital's machine learning research program – GeekWire

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Amazon thinks the cloud can make hospitals run better. The company's Amazon Web Services unit is sponsoring a program at Harvard's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) that applies machine learning to improve hospital efficiency. The initiative will focus on clinical care, operations and waste reduction, which Amazon said will ultimately improve patient care. The Amazon grant will supply as much as $2 million to machine learning research, Bloomberg reported. "Every minute spent on cumbersome clerical tasks and management adds up to millions in lost productivity and directly impacts patient care," Dr. John Halamka, executive director of the Health Technology Exploration Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, said in a statement.


Beth Israel's Halamka on how machine learning can add value for hospitals today

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Artificial intelligence and machine learning have crossed the threshold from theory and pilots to real implementations in hospitals. But the reality of machine learning's role is a bit different from the idyllic vision of IBM Watson reading the New England Journal of Medicine and setting a care plan, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center CIO Dr. John Halamka said in a talk today at the Innovation Live Pavilion at HIMSS19.