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Facebook Messenger update borrows Snapchat's camera feature, letting people send pictures easily

The Independent - Tech

Facebook has borrowed Snapchat's biggest and most famous picture. The company has now built a special camera feature into its Messenger app, and added other visual tools meant to make it easier to send pictures to friends. As well as allowing easy access to the camera, the new Messenger includes animations and special effects that can be laid over the top of pictures. Those filters are one of Snapchat's most central features, and have accounted for a large part of its growth in recent months. In its facilities, JAXA develop satellites and analyse their observation data, train astronauts for utilization in the Japanese Experiment Module'Kibo' of the International Space Station (ISS) and develop launch vehicles 32/39 The robot developed by Seed Solutions sings and dances to the music during the Japan Robot Week 2016 at Tokyo Big Sight.


Snapchat update brings group messages as it looks to take on chat apps like WhatsApp

The Independent - Tech

Snapchat has finally launched group conversations, letting the app take on competitors like WhatsApp. The company will finally let people talk to a group of friends – up to 16 of them – rather than starting individual conversations with a range of different people. The move is perhaps one of its biggest launches in recent years. The company has been gradually looking to become more of a centre for people to have conversations, something that was severely limited by its inability to have group conversations like competitors including WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger. In its facilities, JAXA develop satellites and analyse their observation data, train astronauts for utilization in the Japanese Experiment Module'Kibo' of the International Space Station (ISS) and develop launch vehicles 32/39 The robot developed by Seed Solutions sings and dances to the music during the Japan Robot Week 2016 at Tokyo Big Sight.


Facebook bans Admiral from using profile data for insurance quotes, hours after it was launched

The Independent - Tech

Facebook has banned an insurance company from using people's profiles to price their insurance. Just hours after Admiral announced that it would launch a new app that scoured Facebook profiles and tried to work out their personalities, the site has said that the plan breaks its terms and so will be banned. Admiral had hoped that by using Facebook information it could build up a picture of people, and hopefully work out whether they were more or less likely to crash. Customers could be given up to a 15 per cent discount if they signed up to the app. Connected company president Shigeki Tomoyama addresses a press briefing as he elaborates on Toyota's "connected strategy" in Tokyo.