French surveillance law is unconstitutional after all, highest court says

PCWorld 

The French Constitutional Council has taken another look at a new security law it waved through in July 2015, and found it wanting. A key clause of last year's Surveillance Law essentially allowed security agencies to monitor and control wireless communications without the usual oversight applied to wiretapping operations. This is unconstitutional as the lack of oversight is likely to result in a disproportionate invasion of privacy, the council ruled Friday. It was responding to a complaint filed by La Quadrature du Net (LQDN), an association campaigning for online rights, the ISP French Data Network (FDN) and the Federation of Non-Profit ISPs. The complainants welcomed the decision, saying it "deprived intelligence services of a legal cover unleashing all kinds of illegal surveillance measures," and showed how precise and persistent work can still change the law even after an unfortunate vote.