Russia's elite hacking unit has been silent, but busy

ZDNet 

Turla, one of the codenames given by the cyber-security industry to one of Russia's oldest and most "talented" cyber-espionage unit, has been very active in the past three years, even though their operations have not received the same media coverage of other more flashy Russian hacking outfits. According to new research presented yesterday at the Virus Bulletin security conference held in Montreal, Canada, the group has been behind dozens of hacks around the world, operating with revamped malware and a tendency towards runtime scripting and the usage of open source tools. "Turla was absent from the milestone DNC hack event where Sofacy [APT28] and CozyDuke [APT29] were both present, but Turla was quietly active around the globe on other projects," said Kaspersky's GReAT team in a report published shortly after the presentation. But while APT28 and APT29's loudmouth dissemination of the DNC hacked data has led to public inquiries into their ties to Russian intelligence agencies --which eventually led to several public indictments [1, 2, 3]-- Turla has remained the same mystery as it always was. Considered by many to be Russia's elite hacking unit, Turla is believed to have ties to Moonlight Maze, one of the first government-backed hacking operations ever discovered, back in the 90s.

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