Bank of England picks gay World War II code-breaker Alan Turing for new £50 bank note

The Japan Times 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - Mathematician Alan Turing, whose cracking of a Nazi code helped the Allies to win World War II but who committed suicide after being convicted for homosexuality, will appear on the Bank of England's new £50 banknote, the central bank said Monday. "As the father of computer science and artificial intelligence, as well as war hero, Alan Turing's contributions were far-ranging and path-breaking," BoE Gov. Mark Carney, who took the final decision on the character selection, said. "Turing is a giant on whose shoulders so many now stand." Turing's electro-mechanical machine, a forerunner of modern computers, unraveled the Enigma code used by Nazi Germany and helped give the Allies an advantage in the naval struggle for control of the Atlantic. His work at Bletchley Park, Britain's wartime code-breaking center, was credited with shortening the war and saving many thousands of lives.