How Australia bungled climate policy to create a decade of disappointment Mark Butler

The Guardian > Energy 

In the lead-up to the 2015 general election in the United Kingdom, the leaders of the three major parties sat down together and signed a statement on climate change policy that would seem unimaginable to Australians. They agreed that "climate change is one of the most serious threats facing the world today" and undertook to "to work together across party lines to agree carbon budgets in accordance with the Climate Change Act". They pledged "to accelerate the transition to a competitive, energy efficient, low-carbon economy and to end the use of unabated coal for power generation", meaning that the last coal-fired power station will be closed in the United Kingdom in 2025 at the latest. The 2015 UK election – true to the pledge signed by party leaders – saw no real debate over climate change or energy policy, other than a minor skirmish over the balance between on-shore and off-shore wind power. In the context of the deep cuts in pollution and the profound transition in the energy sector agreed by the parties, the absence of bare-knuckled fighting over these policies was amazing for Australian observers.

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