US transport agency guidance on vehicle cybersecurity irks lawmakers

PCWorld 

Guidance from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for improving motor vehicle cybersecurity has attracted criticism from lawmakers who said that mandatory security standards were required. "This new cybersecurity guidance from the Department of Transportation is like giving a take-home exam on the honor code to failing students," said Senators Edward J. Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts, and Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat from Connecticut, who are both members of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. "In this new Internet of Things era, we cannot let safety, cybersecurity, and privacy be an afterthought," the senators added. On Monday, NHTSA released a document, titled "Cybersecurity best practices for modern vehicles," that laid out the agency's "non- binding guidance" to the automotive industry for improving motor vehicle cybersecurity. Markey and Blumenthal introduced in July last year in the Senate the Security and Privacy in Your Car Act, also known as the SPY Car Act, which would direct the NHTSA and the Federal Trade Commission to establish federal standards for vehicles made for sale in the U.S. that would protect them from unauthorized access to their electronic controls or data collected by electronic systems.

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