Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming

AI Magazine

The second Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming (NLULP) Workshop was held on 17-19 August 1987 at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, (the first NLULP workshop was held three years ago in Rennes, France).


Big Problems for Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

I compare the big problems studied in artificial intelligence and related fields in order to understand some major changes -- both internal and external -- recently suffered by AI. The comparison finds AI with few problems to call its own, and I identify some further major changes that may occur soon.


New Mexico State University's Computing Research Laboratory

AI Magazine

The Computing Research Laboratory (CRL) at New Mexico State University is a center for research in artificial intelligence and cognitive science. Specific areas of research include the human-computer interface, natural language understanding, connectionism, knowledge representation and reasoning, computer vision, robotics, and graph theory. This article describes the ongoing projects at CRL.


Concurrent Logic Programming, Metaprogramming, and Open Systems

AI Magazine

An informal workshop on concurrent logic programming, metaprogramming, and open systems was held at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) on 8-9 September 1987 with support from the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. The 50 workshop participants came from the Japanese Fifth Generation Project (ICOT), the Weizmann Institute of Sci-ence in Israel, Imperial College in London, the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Stanford University, the Mas-sachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Cal Tech, Science University of Tokyo, Melbourne University, Calgary University, University of Wisconsin, Case Western Reserve, University of Oregon, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Quintus, Symbolics, IBM, and Xerox PARC. No proceedings were generated; instead, participants distributed copies of drafts, slides, and recent papers.


New Mexico State University's Computing Research Laboratory

AI Magazine

The Computing Research Laboratory (CRL) at New Mexico State University is a center for research in artificial intelligence and cognitive science. Specific areas of research include the human-computer interface, natural language understanding, connectionism, knowledge representation and reasoning, computer vision, robotics, and graph theory. This article describes the ongoing projects at CRL.


What AI Practitioners Should Know about the Law Part One

AI Magazine

This is Part 1 of a two-part article. Part 2 covers tort liability and computers as expert witnesses. It will appear in the Summer 1988 issue of AI Magazine. Technological developments that remove ever-increasing numbers of cognitive tasks from human control will alter the assumptions on which current legal rules are based. These rules will have a growing impact on AI researchers and entrepreneurs as their work reaches a growing audience of beneficiaries. In order to accommodate the needs of practitioners and their recipients, courts and lawmakers will be forced to reevaluate principles whose foundations were developed well before the implications of advanced technology could have been predicted. This article attempts to identify areas of law in which the need for accommodation will be greatest and provide some insight into the process and the direction of change.


Approximate Processing in Real-Time Problem Solving

AI Magazine

We propose an approach for meeting real-time constraints in AI systems that views (1) time as a resource that should be considered when making control decisions, (2) plans as ways of expressing control decisions, and (3) approximate processing as a way of satisfying time constraints that cannot be achieved through normal processing. In this approach, a real-time problem solver estimates the time required to generate solutions and their quality. This estimate permits the system to anticipate whether the current objectives will be met in time. The system can then take corrective actions and form lower-quality solutions within the time constraints. These actions can involve modifying existing plans or forming radically different plans that utilize only rough data characteristics and approximate knowledge to achieve a desired speedup. A decision about how to change processing should be situation dependent, based on the current state of processing and the domain-dependent solution criteria. We present preliminary experiments that show how approximate processing helps a vehicle-monitoring problem solver meet deadlines and outline a framework for flexibly meeting real-time constraints.


Real-Time Knowledge-Based Systems

AI Magazine

Real-time domains present a new and challenging environment for the application of knowledge-based problem-solving techniques. However, a substantial amount of research is still needed to solve many difficult problems before real-time expert systems can enhance current monitoring and control systems. In this article, we examine how the real-time problem domain is significantly different from those domains which have traditionally been solved by expert systems. We conduct a survey on the current state of the art in applying knowledge-based systems to real-time problems and describe the key issues that are pertinent in a real-time domain. The survey is divided into three areas: applications, tools, and theoretic issues. From the results of the survey, we identify a set of real-time research issues that have yet to be solved and point out limitations of current tools for real-time problems. Finally, we propose a set of requirements that a real-time knowledge-based system must satisfy.


Big Problems for Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

I compare the big problems studied in artificial intelligence and related fields in order to understand some major changes -- both internal and external -- recently suffered by AI. The comparison finds AI with few problems to call its own, and I identify some further major changes that may occur soon.


Letters to the Editor

AI Magazine

Letters to the editor on the lack of a central index to the field's published works and the fact that many original works are not published in journals; praise for Letovsky article -- stimulating and amusing. felt subsequent letters to editors were full of bombastic indignation; criticism of Kasday letter about it and Bob Engelmore's weak support of the article; dualism in regards to Letovsky letter; and a reply to criticism by Letovsky, acknowledging diaristic form.