Drones


Turkey: 6 Kurdish Militants Killed in Drone Attack

U.S. News

Officials say that Turkish security forces have used an armed drone to locate and kill six Kurdish militants who allegedly were responsible for kidnapping and killing a school teacher in southeast Turkey.


drones-become-newest-crime-fighting-tool-for-police.html

FOX News

Just one week after the sheriff's department in Cecil County, Md., got its brand new drone up and running, it was asked to investigate a case of stolen construction equipment. So the Cecil County Sheriff sent his Typhoon H Pro to investigate. The sheriff's department in Somerset County, N.J., hopes its drones could help it find missing people. "Years ago, when we had people wander off, we would bring out the rescue department, the fire department, fire department volunteers, K-9 if we had it and we'd search and search and search and never find the person," said Somerset County Sheriff Frank Provensano.


Robots to the rescue!

Robohub

Robots and drones can be deployed quickly in areas deemed too unsafe for humans and are used to guide rescuers, collect data, deliver essential supplies or provide communication services. IEC TC 47: Semiconductor devices, and its SC 47F: Micro electromechanical systems, are responsible for compiling a wide range of International Standards for the semiconductor devices used in sensors and the MEMS essential to the safe operation of drone flights. IEC TC 2: Rotating machinery, prepares International Standards covering specifications for rotating electrical machines, while IEC TC 91: Electronics assembly technology, is responsible for standards on electronic assembly technologies including components. In addition to IEC TC 47: Semiconductor devices and IEC SC 47F: Microelectromechanical systems, mentioned above, other IEC TCs involved in standardization work for specific areas affecting rescue and disaster relief robots include IEC TC 44: Safety of machinery – Electrotechnical aspects; IEC TC 2: Rotating machinery; IEC TC 17: Switchgear and controlgear; and IEC TC 22: Power electronic systems and equipment.


AK-47 maker Kalashnikov developing AI controlled gun

Daily Mail

Kalashnikov, best known for its AK-47 rifle, is building'a range of products based on neural networks,' including a'fully automated combat module' that can identify and shoot at its targets. The Kalashnikov'combat module' will consist of a gun connected to a console that constantly analyses image data to identify targets. The Kalashnikov'combat module' will consist of a gun connected to a console that constantly crunches image data'to identify targets and make decisions,' Ivanova told TASS. 'A fully automated combat module featuring this technology is planned to be demonstrated at the Army-2017 forum.'


US military begins live-testing LaWS drone-killing laser

Daily Mail

The $40 million (£30 million) super laser moves at the speed of light and is'more precise than a bullet', according to naval officers. US Navy officers are currently testing the world's first drone-killing laser capable of blasting targets with 30kW of power (pictured) The LaWS, which stands for Laser Weapons System, is currently being tested on board the USS Ponce amphibious transport ship. The LaWS, which stands for Laser Weapons System, is currently being tested on board the USS Ponce amphibious transport ship. The $40 million (£30 million) super laser moves at the speed of light and is'more precise than a bullet', according to naval officers The weapon is also extremely precise, which could minimise deaths in wartime, according to the Navy.


Buzz of drones is more annoying than any other kind of vehicle

New Scientist

Amazon, UPS, Domino's Pizza and other companies planning drone delivery services may be heading for discord. A preliminary NASA study has discovered that people find the noise of drones more annoying than that of ground vehicles, even when the sounds are the same volume. "We didn't go into this test thinking there would be this significant difference," says study coauthor Andrew Christian of NASA's Langley Research Center, Virginia. However, Christian points out that simply making drones "only as noisy" as delivery trucks would still mean they are more annoying, meaning companies may need to find ways to make their drones significantly quieter than ground vehicles.


George R. Lawrence took photos of US with first 'drone'

Daily Mail

George R. Lawrence used a system of kites outfitted with a 49-pound camera to show a bird's-eye view of San Francisco, Chicago and New York City - among other cities and towns - in a way that they had never been seen before. This near miss with death prompted him to find a new method to take photos from the skies: He created an incredible drone-like camera by using 17 Conyne kites, strung together by piano wire, to hoist his massive contraption into the air. The device used 17 Conyne kites, strung together by piano wire, to hoist the massive camera into the air. 'The hitherto impossible in photography is our specialty,' was the motto of Lawrence's Chicago studio and these photos show his photos were before their time View: Waukegan is a city and the county seat of Lake County, Illinois and part of the Chicago Metropolitan Area.


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Mashable

If you've ever wondered about what it's like to be inside the International Space Station through the lens of, say, a drone, look no further. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released images and video from its JEM Internal Ball Camera, known as "Int-Ball," -- a camera drone that can record images and video while moving in space -- and the new footage gives us earth-dwellers a sneak peek of the happenings on the space laboratory. According to the JAXA, the Int-Ball was initially delivered to "Kibo," the Japanese Experiment Module on the International Space Station, on June 4, 2017, aboard SpaceX's uncrewed Dragon capsule. With the device and it's recording capabilities, JAXA is giving people a fascinating look at the inner-workings of the International Space Station.


THOR Transformer Drone Hovers and Cruises With No Compromises

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

THOR manages to achieve very high structural efficiency by using all of its aerodynamic surfaces in both vertical and horizontal flight modes, transforming from a flying wing into a sort of whole-body spinning bicopter thing that you really need to see to believe. In hovering mode (which the researchers call H-MOD), THOR spins in place with its airfoils rotated 180 degrees from each other, like the rotors on a helicopter. With the exception of the servo and bearing used for wing rotation, THOR uses every other structural component in both hovering and cruising modes, making it highly efficient relative to hybrid designs. Can you describe the process for the transition between hovering flight and forward flight (or forward flight and hovering flight)?


Meet the International Space Station's adorable camera drone

Engadget

Astronauts on board the International Space Station have a new robotic companion to play around with. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released the first images shot by the "Int-Ball," a spherical camera that floats around alongside the rest of the crew. JAXA says crew members spend 10 percent of their working hours with a camera in hand, photographing work or equipment that requires further evaluation. A floating camera drone could, in theory, alleviate the crew of that responsibility, giving them more time to conduct experiments and carry out repairs.