Europe Government


EU Steps up Legal Cases Against East European States Over Migration

U.S. News

In so-called "reasoned opinions", the Commission has now sent a formal request to these countries to apply EU rules, to which they have one month to respond. Should the Commission not find the answers satisfactory, it can take the countries to court.



European Parliament clears drone regulations for takeoff

PCWorld

Drones weighing less than that would probably have to fall on someone wearing protective headgear from 40 meters (12 stories) or more to cause a fatality, according to the DROPS calculator -- but a careless or irresponsible drone pilot wouldn't need to kill someone to find themselves in trouble. The regulations, when they enter effect, will give additional powers to the EU's executive body, the European Commission, to set rules on maximum operating altitudes and no-fly zones, and to require manufacturers to enforce such rules in drone software. Parliament's transport committee gave its support to the draft drone regulations as part of an update of the EU's civil aviation safety rules, which apply only to aircraft weighing over 150 kg, whether piloted or not. The Commission hopes that, by legislating to make European drones safer, it can boost to the continent's aviation industry.


European lawmakers want robots to pay taxes

#artificialintelligence

That's the takeaway from a draft report on robotics produced by the European Parliament, which warns that artificial intelligence and increased automation present legal and ethical challenges that could have dire consequences. "Within the space of a few decades [artificial intelligence] could surpass human intellectual capacity in a manner which, if not prepared for, could pose a challenge to humanity's capacity to control its own creation and ... the survival of the species," the draft states. If advanced robots start replacing human workers in large numbers, the report recommends the European Commission force their owners to pay taxes or contribute to social security. In April, the European Parliament's legal affairs committee held a hearing to discuss the issue.


European lawmakers want robots to pay taxes

#artificialintelligence

That's the takeaway from a draft report on robotics produced by the European Parliament, which warns that artificial intelligence and increased automation present legal and ethical challenges that could have dire consequences. "Within the space of a few decades [artificial intelligence] could surpass human intellectual capacity in a manner which, if not prepared for, could pose a challenge to humanity's capacity to control its own creation and ... the survival of the species," the draft states. If advanced robots start replacing human workers in large numbers, the report recommends the European Commission force their owners to pay taxes or contribute to social security. In April, the European Parliament's legal affairs committee held a hearing to discuss the issue.