Secondary


[D] Research topic for a high school student • r/MachineLearning

@machinelearnbot

I'm practicing explaining ML concepts, so, experts, please correct me if any of my points are incorrect or misleading. For example, I was reading an example of regression analysis where the factors such as cylinders, displacement, horsepower affect the mpg of a car. The topic would touch on how many of these factors, or neurons is too much. It seems like you may be conflating features, data about what you're observing that you give as inputs to your model, such as "cylinders, displacement, horsepower", and neurons, which are fine-tuned by training to make up the function you're trying to learn. Maybe I can help you by giving a few reasons people don't just keep increasing the number of neurons.


Artificial Intelligence and High School Students -- Trying AIY for the First Time!

#artificialintelligence

When we made episodes of #CoffeeWithAGoogler covering Google's Artificial Intelligence Yourself (AIY) project, we wanted to test the product with a group of high school kids. We were blown away by the results -- come check it out for yourself!


How Artificial Intelligence Will Change School Forever

#artificialintelligence

Nothing reveals as much about a society, and its future, as its high schools. Yet amid accelerating change -- widening inequality, unprecedented globalization and technological advances -- they've woefully lagged behind. There are, of course, exceptions. Follow OZY's special series High School, Disrupted to find out about the global leaders, cutting-edge trends and big ideas reimagining secondary education -- for the better. From Siri handling our schedules to smart cars driving themselves, artificial intelligence (AI) has turned our world upside down -- except in education.


For AI, a real-world reality check Google

#artificialintelligence

For the past three summers, around two dozen would-be computer scientists have come to Stanford University to learn about artificial intelligence from some of the field's brightest. The attendees, culled from hundreds of applicants, take day trips to nearby tech companies, interact with social robots and hexacopters, and learn about computational linguistics (what machines do when words have multiple meanings, say) and the importance of time management (very). But if your mental picture of AI is a bunch of guys creating wilier enemies for their favorite videogames, well, this isn't that. All the students here at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's Outreach Summer (SAILORS) program are girls who have just completed ninth grade, and their studies focus on finding ways to improve lives, not enhance their game play: How do we use AI to keep jumbo jets from careening into one another? To ensure that doctors wash their hands before hitting the OR? "Our goal was to rethink AI education in a way that encourages diversity and students from all walks of life," says Fei-Fei Li, director of Stanford's AI lab and a founder of the SAILORS program.


Love of anime prompts young Filipinos to pursue Japanese studies in select high schools

The Japan Times

As such, it was only natural for them to decide to enroll in the Japanese language and culture course that Makati Science High School has been offering ninth- and 10th-graders over the past few years. "My reason for joining the nihongo (Japanese-language) class was initially for anime. But halfway through, I realized I can use it to be able to experience going to Japan," 16-year-old Franza, who took the elective course for two years starting in 2015, said in a recent interview. Chee, who is a year younger than Franza, said, "One of my life goals (includes) watching anime without subtitles. The Filipino Department of Education started offering the Japanese language and culture program to high school students in 2009, together with Spanish and French, to prepare young Filipinos for both local and international opportunities that would require communicative competence in a second foreign language, after English.


Melinda Gates and Fei-Fei Li Want to Liberate AI from "Guys With Hoodies"

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence has a diversity problem. Too many of the people creating it share a similar background. To renowned researcher Fei-Fei Li, this paucity of viewpoints constitutes a crisis: "As an educator, as a woman, as a woman of color, as a mother, I'm increasingly worried," she says. "AI is about to make the biggest changes to humanity, and we're missing a whole generation of diverse technologists and leaders." From the chair next to her, Melinda Gates affirms this, adding, "If we don't get women and people of color at the table -- real technologists doing the real work -- we will bias systems. Trying to reverse that a decade or two from now will be so much more difficult, if not close to impossible."


Melinda Gates and Fei-Fei Li Want to Liberate AI from "Guys With Hoodies"

@machinelearnbot

Artificial intelligence has a diversity problem. Too many of the people creating it share a similar background. To renowned researcher Fei-Fei Li, this paucity of viewpoints constitutes a crisis: "As an educator, as a woman, as a woman of color, as a mother, I'm increasingly worried," she says. "AI is about to make the biggest changes to humanity, and we're missing a whole generation of diverse technologists and leaders." From the chair next to her, Melinda Gates affirms this, adding, "If we don't get women and people of color at the table -- real technologists doing the real work -- we will bias systems. Trying to reverse that a decade or two from now will be so much more difficult, if not close to impossible."


How Artificial Intelligence Will Invade Classrooms

#artificialintelligence

Nothing reveals as much about a society, and its future, as its high schools. Yet amid accelerating change -- widening inequality, unprecedented globalization and technological advances -- they've woefully lagged behind. There are, of course, exceptions. Follow OZY's special series High School, Disrupted to find out about the global leaders, cutting-edge trends and big ideas reimagining secondary education -- for the better. From Siri handling our schedules to smart cars driving themselves, artificial intelligence (AI) has turned our world upside down -- except in education.


87.02.04: Science Fiction and the Future

AITopics Original Links

The Talented and Gifted Program (TAG) in New Haven is a comprehensive kindergarten through twelfth grade program that has a different format for each of its four components. The 4-7 program, upon which this paper focuses, is comprised of three resource rooms in three different schools in the city. Students attend for one full day each week. The 4-7 TAG resource rooms provide an enrichment, rather than strictly accelerated, program. Activities at each grade level are planned around core areas of study.


Can an AI Get Into the University of Tokyo?

AITopics Original Links

For the thousands of secondary school students who take Japan's university entrance exams each year, test days are long-dreaded nightmares of jitters and sweaty palms. But the newest test taker can be counted on to keep its cool: AIs don't sweat. At Japan's National Institute of Informatics (NII), in Tokyo, a research team is trying to create an artificial intelligence program that has enough smarts to pass Japan's most rigorous entrance exams. The AI will start by taking the standardized test administered to all secondary school students; once it masters that test, it will move on to the more difficult University of Tokyo exam. "Passing the exam is not really an important research issue, but setting a concrete goal is useful," says Noriko Arai, the team leader and a professor at NII.