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IBM Watson's Chief Architect Talks Democratizing AI, Starting With Fifth Graders (EdSurge News)

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The mission to make AI consumable is the reason Puri spends his free time coaching a group of fifth-grade girls in Westchester, New York, for the First Lego League robotics competition. "You can put the device on the side of a building, and when it detects motion, it takes a picture," Puri explains, "If the picture is a bird, it identifies the bird species and sends it to Watson. His other daughter, a 10th grader, spends a lot of time studying the intersections of biology and AI. But to get more students on board, Puri thinks educators should engage students with the "fun" applications of AI, before bogging them down with equations.


Enrolling in Artificial Intelligence Kindergarten – CSC Blogs

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Building really intelligent machines, or so-called strong artificial intelligence (AI), is a daunting task for technology. This power of understanding (semantically) the car, rather than extracting statistical properties of pictures of cars, is the difference between strong, biological intelligence and the weak, machine intelligence of today. But strong AI organizes its knowledge in learning rules, and not in the box. Therefore, the problem of creating strong AI, is the problem of making machines learn new learning rules.


Next Target for IBM's Watson? Third-Grade Math

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For the past two years, the IBM Foundation has worked with teachers and their union, the American Federation of Teachers, to build Teacher Advisor, a program that uses artificial-intelligence technology to answer questions from educators and help them build personalized lesson plans. "The idea was to build a personal adviser, so a teacher would be able to find the best lesson and then customize the lesson based upon their classroom needs," said Stanley S. Litow, president of the IBM Foundation. "By loading a massive amount of content, of teaching strategies, lesson plans, you'd actually make Watson the teacher coach," Mr. Litow said. For teachers, one thing Watson will do is help them digest the Common Core standards and incorporate them into daily lessons.


Google is building a robotic hive-mind kindergarten

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In three separate research papers posted online Monday, researchers at Google and other Alphabet subsidiaries showed several ways in which robots can learn to perform simple tasks more quickly by sharing different types of learning experiences. The researchers are training teams of industrial robots to perform simple tasks using a technique called reinforcement learning, which combines trial and error with positive feedback. Sharing the learning process, a technique often called cloud robotics, can help accelerate the process, although the idea remains at an early stage (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies: Robots That Teach Each Other"). In the first experiment, the goal was turning a door handle and opening a door, and four different robots were set to work practicing on different doors and handle types.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher advisor • LiketheFuture

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Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? Watson's Teacher Advisor can help them create exercises and lessons to make it easier for kids to grasp Common Core math.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher

Engadget

Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? Watson's Teacher Advisor can help them create exercises and lessons to make it easier for kids to grasp Common Core math.


Building a chatbot that's smarter than a fifth grader

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Qualities like natural language processing, voice recognition, automatic speech recognition, and question and intent analysis are components that will eventually lead to brands building smarter bots that can offer more sophisticated -- and human-like -- digital experiences for their customers. That said, like bots at the kindergarten level, these grade school bots don't have access to phone data beyond the information held in the specific application that houses the bot. To get to college level, bots need access to data beyond the app in which they live to understand user context. The search company recently purchased Api.ai, a startup focused on natural language processing, and it is also spearheading projects like DeepMind, which recently made significant headway in speech synthesis.


Only the privileged fear a robot revolution

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Because the foundation that is laid for those skills is in early education, it's noteworthy that in low-income countries only 57 percent of the children who enter primary school complete it. If harnessed to bring education to those aforementioned 250 million children who go without it, AI has the potential to lower poverty rates, increase literacy, lower infant mortality rates, contribute to an overall better quality of life and even help mitigate climate change. With the possibility to save millions of lives, reduce infant mortality rates and create a more sustainable and equal world, what is keeping us from taking action? When you think of the millions of lives that could be saved and improved by access to basic healthcare and education, it makes the idea of fearing the further advancement of artificial intelligence seem myopic.


'Robot kindergarten' trains droids of the future

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Less than 100 years from now, robots will be friendly, useful participants in our homes and workplaces, predicts UBC mechanical engineering professor and robotics expert Elizabeth Croft. And finally, machine learning: networked computer systems have global access to huge amounts of data that, combined with robotic embodiment, allow robots to learn about the world in ways that mimic and move beyond how people learn about their environment. We are teaching robots basic, building-block behaviours and ground rules for how they interact with people: how to hand over a bottle of water, how to look for things, how to take turns. To achieve our goals, our lab welcomes researchers from different disciplines--ethics, law, machine learning, experts in human computer interaction--as well as different international cultures.