Primary


The Classroom of Tomorrow Takes its Cues From Tech Startups

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The experimental classroom is part of a wave of so-called maker spaces popping up at schools across the country. They're designed to facilitate complex play--open-ended, thought-provoking activities that involve tinkering and engineering with no "right" answer. According to Donna Ross, an associate professor of science education at San Diego State University, research suggests that these activities foster problem-solving, critical thinking and team-building skills--all attributes valued by today's employers. As screen time and highly structured activities have colonized children's off hours, "we're trying to build [complex play] into the formal school day," Ross said. The $200,000 space at Haine was funded by a state grant and opened in September; almost 1,500 students in kindergarten through sixth grade use it each week.


Pyongyang provides state-of-the-art tech for training future teachers

The Japan Times

PYONGYANG – North Korea has recently started to introduce state-of-the-art technology for the training of future schoolteachers in a possible world first. At the newly remodeled Pyongyang Teacher Training College, the mostly female students study how to educate kindergartners and primary school children with the aid of virtual reality and 3D display technologies. A group of Kyodo News reporters was granted rare access to the college late last week. In one classroom is installed a large widescreen monitor on which are displayed animated avatars representing primary school pupils. Speaking to the virtual children through a microphone, they respond in a timely manner.


Class Act: Irving sixth grader designs robot that could aid school safety

#artificialintelligence

You're never too young to start making a huge impact. That's what makes Jaime Cuevas our Class Act of the Week. Jaime is just in the sixth grade at Lamar Middle School, but he's already inventing some big things!


Will this artificial intelligence system keep your kindergarten toddlers safe?

#artificialintelligence

While China has invested an enormous amount in artificial intelligence in recent years, most video analysis systems are currently used in national security, including defence and anti-terrorism activities.


Google's AI is no smarter than a first grader, study says

#artificialintelligence

Google's AlphaGo may have unseated Ke Jie as the Go world champion but it's no smarter than a kindergartner. A study published Saturday showed Google's artificial intelligence technology scored best out of 50 systems that Chinese researchers tested against an AI scale they created, although it's still no smarter than a six year old, CNBC reported Monday. AI systems have developed so quickly that it's been able to act as an assistant, take an exam and even outperform us at strategy games.


Google's AI is no smarter than a first grader, study says

#artificialintelligence

Google's AlphaGo defeated Chinese Go player Ke Jie (left) this year to become the world champion. Google's AlphaGo may have unseated Ke Jie as the Go world champion this year, but the artificial intelligence behind AlphaGo is actually no smarter than a 6-year-old child. A study published Saturday showed Google's artificial intelligence technology scored best out of 50 systems that Chinese researchers tested against an AI scale they created, CNBC reported Monday. With a IQ score of 47.28, Google's AI was almost twice as smart as Apple virtual assistant Siri, which scored 23.94. AI systems have developed so quickly that they've been able to act as assistants, take exams and even outperform us at strategy games.


IBM Watson's Chief Architect Talks Democratizing AI, Starting With Fifth Graders (EdSurge News)

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) systems can recognize your speech like Siri or identify images like Facebook, but these types of machine intelligences are built on statistical approximation, using loads of data to make educated guesses. Though statistical approximation was a significant technological advancement for devices, experts at Future Lab's AI Summit in New York City believe that it is time to expand the bounds of artificial intelligence--to democratize it--by "engineering knowledge." For Puri, that is the next level of AI--its ability to not only say what something is, but to reason and understand the intent of its being, to answer the'why' question. "Working with kids gives you grounding. They ask questions because they are not shy," says IBM Watson's Chief Architect, Dr. Ruchir Puri, in an interview with EdSurge.


Enrolling in Artificial Intelligence Kindergarten – CSC Blogs

#artificialintelligence

Building really intelligent machines, or so-called strong artificial intelligence (AI), is a daunting task for technology. I've worked on an approach that requires two technological novelties: One is a new way to organize knowledge; the other is a new way to acquire knowledge. The resulting method is called AI-Kindergarten and allows for the development of AI that is intelligent in a way that mimics biological processes. While almost everyone is glad to see the recent progress in AI, some people take it as a sign of tremendous development to come. Will AI advance to the level of intelligence comparable to that of a human -- or higher?


Robots and drones take over classrooms - BBC News

#artificialintelligence

Classrooms are noticeably more hi-tech these days - interactive boards, laptops and online learning plans proliferate, but has the curriculum actually changed or are children simply learning the same thing on different devices? Some argue that the education this generation of children is receiving is little different from that their parents or even their grandparents had. But, in a world where artificial intelligence and robots threaten jobs, the skills that this generation of children need to learn are likely to be radically different to the three Rs that have for so long been the mainstay of education. The BBC went along to the Bett conference in London in search of different ways of teaching and learning. A stone's throw from the Excel, where Bett is held, stands a new school that is, according to its head Geoffrey Fowler, currently little more than a Portakabin.


Future school

BBC News

Classrooms are noticeably more hi-tech these days - interactive boards, laptops and online learning plans proliferate, but has the curriculum actually changed or are children simply learning the same thing on different devices? Some argue that the education this generation of children is receiving is little different from that their parents or even their grandparents had. But, in a world where artificial intelligence and robots threaten jobs, the skills that this generation of children need to learn are likely to be radically different to the three Rs that have for so long been the mainstay of education. The BBC went along to the Bett conference in London in search of different ways of teaching and learning. A stone's throw from the Excel, where Bett is held, stands a new school that is, according to its head Geoffrey Fowler, currently little more than a Portakabin.