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IBM Watson's Chief Architect Talks Democratizing AI, Starting With Fifth Graders (EdSurge News)

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The mission to make AI consumable is the reason Puri spends his free time coaching a group of fifth-grade girls in Westchester, New York, for the First Lego League robotics competition. "You can put the device on the side of a building, and when it detects motion, it takes a picture," Puri explains, "If the picture is a bird, it identifies the bird species and sends it to Watson. His other daughter, a 10th grader, spends a lot of time studying the intersections of biology and AI. But to get more students on board, Puri thinks educators should engage students with the "fun" applications of AI, before bogging them down with equations.


Software Called Aristo Can Take on High School Science Exams

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Aristo is being developed by researchers at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle, who want to give machines a measure of common sense about the world. You can see Aristo answer selected fourth-grade questions at the Allen Institute website. "What's difficult for humans is very different from what's difficult for machines," says Davis, who also works on giving software common sense. Etzioni counters that although school test questions don't directly test very basic common sense, they require it implicitly, because it is needed to interpret the questions.


Next Target for IBM's Watson? Third-Grade Math

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For the past two years, the IBM Foundation has worked with teachers and their union, the American Federation of Teachers, to build Teacher Advisor, a program that uses artificial-intelligence technology to answer questions from educators and help them build personalized lesson plans. "The idea was to build a personal adviser, so a teacher would be able to find the best lesson and then customize the lesson based upon their classroom needs," said Stanley S. Litow, president of the IBM Foundation. "By loading a massive amount of content, of teaching strategies, lesson plans, you'd actually make Watson the teacher coach," Mr. Litow said. For teachers, one thing Watson will do is help them digest the Common Core standards and incorporate them into daily lessons.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher advisor • LiketheFuture

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Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? Watson's Teacher Advisor can help them create exercises and lessons to make it easier for kids to grasp Common Core math.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher

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Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? Watson's Teacher Advisor can help them create exercises and lessons to make it easier for kids to grasp Common Core math.


Building a chatbot that's smarter than a fifth grader

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Qualities like natural language processing, voice recognition, automatic speech recognition, and question and intent analysis are components that will eventually lead to brands building smarter bots that can offer more sophisticated -- and human-like -- digital experiences for their customers. That said, like bots at the kindergarten level, these grade school bots don't have access to phone data beyond the information held in the specific application that houses the bot. To get to college level, bots need access to data beyond the app in which they live to understand user context. The search company recently purchased Api.ai, a startup focused on natural language processing, and it is also spearheading projects like DeepMind, which recently made significant headway in speech synthesis.


Is A.I. Smarter Than a Fifth Grader? No. Nor a Fourth Grader. - Seattle Weekly

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Every day in Seattle, Aristo takes a mostly multiple-choice fourth-grade science test. The slow process of getting Aristo up to speed on basic scientific concepts is due to the big difference between artificial intelligence applying logic and a brute-force sifting of facts until the right one is found. The Institute's tests are designed to make Aristo think--that is, to search within its databases, find patterns among those facts, apply logic to those patterns, and answer questions that need logic and not solely memory. Elsewhere at the Institute, other teams are working on artificial intelligence programs involving advanced searches through scientific literature, solving SAT-level math and geometry problems, and extracting information from images, videos, and diagrams.