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#IJCAI invited talk: engineering social and collaborative agents with Ana Paiva

AIHub

The 31st International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 25th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJACI-ECAI 2022) took place from 23-29 July, in Vienna. In this post, we continue our round-up of the invited talks, summarising the presentation by Ana Paiva, University of Lisbon and INESC-ID. The title of her talk was "Engineering sociality and collaboration in AI systems". Robots are widely used in industrial settings, but what happens when they enter our everyday world, and, specifically, social situations? Ana believes that social robots, chatbots and social agents have the potential to change the way we interact with technology.


'Brain switch' stops us from running before the starting gun is fired, study finds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Experts have discovered an'impulsivity switch' in the brain that lets mammals suppress the urge to'jump the gun' and only act when the time is right. In lab experiments on mice, researchers found a brain area that's responsible for driving action and another that's responsible for suppressing that drive. Manipulating neurons, also known as nerve cells, in these areas can override our ability to control the urge to jump the gun and therefore trigger impulsive behaviour. Keeping the'impulsivity switch' on is how athletes stop themselves from running before the starting gun has fired, how dogs obey a command to resist a treat, or how lions in the wild can wait for the perfect moment to pounce on its prey. Keeping our'impulsivity switch' on is how athletes stop themselves from running before the starting gun has fired (file photo) 'We discovered a brain area responsible for driving action and another for suppressing that drive,' said study author Joe Paton, director of the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme in Lisbon, Portugal.


Machine Translation Evaluation with Cometinho

#artificialintelligence

The European Association for Machine Translation (EAMT) conference is a venue where MT researchers, users and translators gather to discuss the latest advances in the industry. It is really interesting to go there and see what is going on in the European continent in terms of MT development and adoption. In this article, I want to share some ideas from the Best Paper Award of this year. Its title is "Searching for COMETINHO: The Little Metric That Could", from the research lab of Unbabel, a company based in Lisbon, Portugal that offers translation services using MT and human translators. You can find the online version of the paper in the ACL Anthology.


Newspaper articles written by robots?

#artificialintelligence

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, arguably one of the smartest people in history, warned, in an interview with the BBC, that, "the development of full artificial intelligence (AI) could spell the end of the human race." Hawking went on to say, at the Web Summit technology conference in Lisbon, Portugal, "AI could be the worst event in the history of our civilization. It brings dangers, like powerful autonomous weapons, or new ways for the few to oppress the many. It could bring great disruption to our economy." In 2015, dozens of brainiac scientists and technology experts, including celebrity physicists like Hawking and Elon Musk, signed a letter warning that, even though AI could be used for great good, it could also have potentially devastating, dangerous and unintended uses.


Quantum Computing: 5 Potential Applications - AI Summary

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Modern financial markets are extremely complex with hedge funders, investment banks and retail investors trading millions of stocks globally every second. By applying quantum technology to algorithmic trading, it would be possible to trigger share dealings based on market variables in a way that currently isn't possible with today's much slower computers. Smart cities, where everything from rubbish disposal to traffic flow can be controlled using IoT sensors alongside AI and machine learning technologies, are becoming more widespread. Working with Lisbon's transit system during the 2019 Web Summit, it used quantum computing to route buses efficiently through the city. Capable of analyzing large amounts of data simultaneously and at speed, quantum computers promise much greater levels of accuracy, particularly when it comes to providing predictions for smaller, more specific regions.


On the Role of Multi-Objective Optimization to the Transit Network Design Problem

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Ongoing traffic changes, including those triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, reveal the necessity to adapt our public transport systems to the ever-changing users' needs. This work shows that single and multi objective stances can be synergistically combined to better answer the transit network design problem (TNDP). Single objective formulations are dynamically inferred from the rating of networks in the approximated (multi-objective) Pareto Front, where a regression approach is used to infer the optimal weights of transfer needs, times, distances, coverage, and costs. As a guiding case study, the solution is applied to the multimodal public transport network in the city of Lisbon, Portugal. The system takes individual trip data given by smartcard validations at CARRIS buses and METRO subway stations and uses them to estimate the origin-destination demand in the city. Then, Genetic Algorithms are used, considering both single and multi objective approaches, to redesign the bus network that better fits the observed traffic demand. The proposed TNDP optimization proved to improve results, with reductions in objective functions of up to 28.3%. The system managed to extensively reduce the number of routes, and all passenger related objectives, including travel time and transfers per trip, significantly improve. Grounded on automated fare collection data, the system can incrementally redesign the bus network to dynamically handle ongoing changes to the city traffic.


ICPRAM 2021 Conference Report

Interactive AI Magazine

ICPRAM 2021 (10th International Conference on Pattern Recognition Applications and Methods) received 97 paper submissions from 30 countries. To evaluate each submission, a double‐blind paper review was performed by the Program Committee. After a stringent selection process, 21 papers were published and presented as full papers, i.e. completed work (12 pages/25' oral presentation), 53 papers were accepted as short papers (28 as oral presentation and 25 as poster presentation). ICPRAM's program included three invited talks delivered by internationally distinguished speakers, namely: The papers were organized in thirteen parallel sessions ranging from areas such as Machine Learning Methods; Deep Learning and Neural Networks; Classification and Clustering; Natural Language Processing; Theory and Methods; Methods and Applications; and Image and Video Analysis and Understanding. The organizing committee included the ICPRAM Conference Chair: Ana Fred, Instituto de Telecomunicações and University of Lisbon, Portugal; and the Program Co‐Chairs: Maria De Marsico, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy; and Gabriella Sanniti di Baja, Italian National Research Council CNR, Italy.


Leading the Robot Invasion of the Old Boys' Club

#artificialintelligence

Trailblazers Week celebrates the women who have pushed boundaries and paved the way for others in their industries. Manuela Veloso grew up in Portugal in the 1960s and '70s in a household where innovations, from the moon landing to the building of a huge bridge in Lisbon, were the subject of dinner-table discussion. In 1994, she moved to the U.S. to earn a master's degree in computer science, and she went on to get her Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon. It was the golden era of artificial intelligence, the "years of deep thoughts, chess playing, hopping robots," she tells the Cut. Veloso spent more than two decades at the university, working her way up to become the head of its machine-learning department, and has been researching artificial intelligence ever since -- now as head of AI research at JPMorgan and professor emeritus at Carnegie Mellon.


5 ways artificial intelligence could shape our lives

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LISBON (AFP) - Technology evangelists habitually brim with enthusiasm over artificial intelligence's potential to transform our lives, and the crowds at this year's Web Summit were no exception. Here are five uses for AI showcased at one of the world's largest technology conferences, which returned to Lisbon last week after the 2020 edition was called off due to the pandemic. When Iker Casillas learned of a start-up that uses AI to better detect irregular heart rhythms, he swiftly signed up as an investor. The Spanish football legend had suffered a heart attack in 2019, putting a brutal end to his career. Madrid-based company Idoven analyses data from home heart monitoring kits to track people's cardiac health - and crucially, to flag up looming problems.


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

Tech evangelists habitually brim with enthusiasm over artificial intelligence's potential to transform our lives, and the crowds at this year's Web Summit were no exception. Here are five uses for AI showcased at one of the world's largest technology conferences, which returned to Lisbon this week after the 2020 edition was called off due to the pandemic. When Iker Casillas learned of a start-up that uses AI to better detect irregular heart rhythms, he swiftly signed up as an investor. Madrid-based company Idoven analyses data from home heart monitoring kits to track people's cardiac health – and crucially, to flag up looming problems.