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United States Air Force Starts Artificial Intelligence Project To Analyze Flow Of Information

#artificialintelligence

Six F16 of the US Air Force fly over Paris during the annual Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris on July 14, 2017. The parade on Paris's Champs-Elysees will commemorate the centenary of the US entering WWI and will feature horses, helicopters, planes, and troops. In June 2017, artificial intelligence (AI) startup, SparkCognition raised $32.5 million Series B funding for its AI powered cyber-physical software (CPS). The round led by Verizon Ventures with participation by Boeing's HorizonX unit. In July 2017, the company announced an eight to 10-month project with the United States Air Force (USAF) to bring AI by the DiuX, which accelerates commercial innovation for national defense.


Machine learning comes to Tour de France

#artificialintelligence

Cycling fans will be able to get deeper insights into one of the most popular races, Tour de France, with the introduction of machine learning algorithm. The race, which began in Düsseldorf, Germany on July 1, finishes at the Champs-Élysées in Paris on July 23. The new data analytics platform combines live and historical race data, and also enables fans to benefit from rider profiles to understand better the environments and circumstances in which riders perform best. At the core of the live tracking and data analytics solution are GPS transponders installed under the saddles of each bike. The data collected from these transponders is combined with external data about the course gradient and prevailing weather conditions to generate insights such as live speed and the location of individual riders, distance between riders, and composition of groups within the race.


Machine Learning Comes to Tour de France - insideBIGDATA

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Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O.), organizers of the Tour de France, and Dimension Data, the Official Technology Partner of the Tour de France, announced the introduction of machine learning technologies at this year's Tour de France to give cycling fans across the globe an unprecedented experience of this year's event. The race begins in Düsseldorf on Saturday and finishes at the Champs-Élysées in Paris on 23 July. This year, Dimension Data's data analytics platform, which was developed in partnership with A.S.O., incorporates machine learning and complex algorithms that combine live and historical race data to provide even deeper levels of insight as the race unfolds. Fans will also benefit from rider profiles to understand more about environments and circumstances in which riders perform best. As part of a new pilot this year, A.S.O. and Dimension Data are exploring the role of predictive analytics technologies to assess the likelihood of various race scenarios, such as whether the peloton will catch the breakaway riders at certain stages of the race.


Machine Learning Comes to Tour De France

#artificialintelligence

LONDON & PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O.), organisers of the Tour de France, and Dimension Data, the Official Technology Partner of the Tour de France, today announced the introduction of machine learning technologies at this year's Tour de France to give cycling fans across the globe an unprecedented experience of this year's event. The race begins in Düsseldorf on Saturday and finishes at the Champs-Élysées in Paris on 23 July. This year, Dimension Data's data analytics platform, which was developed in partnership with A.S.O., incorporates machine learning and complex algorithms that combine live and historical race data to provide even deeper levels of insight as the race unfolds. Fans will also benefit from rider profiles to understand more about environments and circumstances in which riders perform best. As part of a new pilot this year, A.S.O. and Dimension Data are exploring the role of predictive analytics technologies to assess the likelihood of various race scenarios, such as whether the peloton will catch the breakaway riders at certain stages of the race.


Dimension Data brings machine learning to the Tour de France - CBR

#artificialintelligence

Predictive analytics functionality is also going to be tested out for the first time. Dimension Data is helping to bring machine learning to the Tour de France. The world famous bike race, which beings in Düsseldorf on Saturday and finishes at the Champs-Élysées in Paris on the 23rd July, is for the first time having machine learning algorithms applied to it. The Dimension Data analytics platform, which was developed in partnership with A.S.O, the organisers of the Tour de France, applies machine learning and algorithms that combine live and historical race data to provide a deeper level of insight into the race. Fans will be able to see rider profiles and learn more about the environments and circumstances in which they perform best.


All that's cool and quirky at the Paris Air Show

Daily Mail - Science & tech

There are flying cars and Concorde's would-be supersonic successor, a company offering to deliver cargo to the Moon - for a mere $1.2 million per kilogram - and the latest in funky futuristic aviation ideas, both big and small. No doubt about it: the Paris Air Show is an aerospace geek's paradise. But with everything from the smallest drones to the largest passenger jets on display, it's tough to sift through it all. So here's a guide to some of the cool things that caught our eye this week. Visitors looks at the flying car Pegasus 1, built by French entrepreneur Jerome Dauffy at Paris Air Show, in Le Bourget, east of Paris, France, Tuesday, June 20, 2017 in Paris.


Fully Driverless Cars Could Be On The Road For The First Time Next Year

International Business Times

France could be the first country to have fully autonomous cars on the road next year. The Associated Press reported that French companies Delphi and Transdev will partner to create taxi and shuttle services that transport passengers without a driver. The testing will start with on-demand driverless vehicles in Normandy and a van service that will shuttle passengers between a train station and the campus of the University of Paris Saclay. The route between the campus and train station is aimed at addressing a "first mile-last mile" gap in public transportation, getting people from their final destinations and start points to public transit. The services will begin with humans on board to give instruction before the planned fully autonomous phase in 2018.


The Frankenstein Factor in IT – Therapy needed for our AI Future

#artificialintelligence

Paris, France, 2 May, 2017 – We are on the threshold of an extraordinary development that makes the automation heart beat faster. Recent announcements by both Facebook and tech pioneer Elon Musk to build brain interfaces are great examples. But together with the expanding possibilities of Artificial Intelligence (AI), emotions run higher and higher. A new report from SogetiLabs'The Frankenstein Factor: the Anatomy of Fear of AI' recommends taking these emotions seriously and pleads for a therapeutic approach. A focus on IT efficiency and effectiveness should be accompanied by a focus on human existence.


UFO sighting over major city?

FOX News

A new video has appeared of what was claimed to be a cigar-shaped ship hovering over Paris, France, which UFO watchers say is potentially the same object spotted over China and Australia several years ago. It is unclear if the object -- which the video shows beaming light down on the ground -- is a hoax. The video was posted to YouTube by Secureteam10, a conspiracy channel that often posts UFO sightings. Tyler Glockner, who runs Secureteam10, said on the video that he was unable to find the original recording of the video and wondererd aloud whether it could be a hoax. In a separate video, the conspiracy channel noted that the Paris sighting is similar to ones seen in China and Australia in recent years.


Our ability to think in a random way peaks at 25 then declines

New Scientist

It's surprisingly difficult to come up with a truly random sequence of numbers or items. Doing so requires cognitive skills such as memory and attention, as well as a sense of complexity. "Our brains are wired to find patterns even where there are none – for example, when looking at clouds or stars in the sky," says Hector Zenil at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and the LABORES Research Lab in Paris, France. Zenil and his colleagues have now found that our ability to think up random sequences peaks when we reach 25 before declining with age. This mirrors the evolution and decline of our cognitive abilities, suggesting that monitoring this skill could give an insight into these changes over time.