Baikonur


Russian capsule carrying robot docks at space station

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In this photo taken on Friday, July 26, 2019, and distributed by Roscosmos Space Agency Press Service, the Fedor robot is displayed before being loaded into a Soyuz capsule that was launched Thursday Aug. 22, 2019, from the launch pad at Russia's space facility in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. A Russian space capsule carrying a humanoid robot has failed to dock as planned with the International Space Station. A statement from the Russian space agency Roscosmos said the failure to dock on Saturday Aug. 24, 2019, was because of problems in the docking system, but didn't give details.


Russia Launches Humanoid Robot FEDOR Into Space

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A Russian humanoid robot was making its way on Thursday to the International Space Station after blasting off on a two-week mission to support the crew and test his skills. Known as FEDOR, which stands for Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research, the Skybot F-850 is the first humanoid robot to be sent to space by Russia. NASA sent humanoid robot Robonaut 2 to space in 2011 to work in hazardous environments. "The robot's main purpose it to be used in operations that are especially dangerous for humans onboard spacecraft and in outer space," Russian space agency Roscosmos said on Thursday after the launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. The ISS is a joint project of the space agencies of the United States, Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada.


Russia blasts futuristic humanoid robot into orbit to complete 'hazardous' space tasks

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Fedor, which is travelling to the orbital outpost aboard the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft, was created by Russia's Android Technology Company and the Advanced Research Fund on a technical assignment from Moscow's Emergencies Ministry. Its basic goals include transmitting telemetry data, determining parameters related to the flight safety, including overloads, and carrying out experiments to test the Skybot's operations capabilities on spacewalks outside the ISS. A Soyuz-2.1a carrier rocket blasted off from the Gagarin Start launch pad of the Baikonur spaceport in Kazakhstan yesterday delivering the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft with Fedor into the near-Earth orbit.


Russia's space agency releases eerie footage of human-like android Fedor

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russia's space agency has released eerie footage of its human-like android which will board the International Space Station next week. Nicknamed Fedor - which stands for Final Experimental Demonstration Research - the anthropomorphous machine was seen undergoing a battery of stress-tests at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Dubbed Putin's robo-naut, the machine can be seen determining targets and honing in on specific points, such as steering wheels, which will surely come in handy while they're in orbit. The scenes come ahead of its inclusion on the unmanned Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft on 22 August 2019. 'MMA fighter' loses temper and battles two revellers at once In action: Dubbed Putin's robo-naut, the machine can be seen determining targets and honing in on specific points, such as steering wheels, which will surely come in handy while they're in orbit On time: Putin's deputy premier, Dmitry Rogozin, claimed the war in Syria had shown Russia the importance of robots in difficult environments, and promised Fedor would make its space debut in five years - a deadline it will soon meet Fedor stands 6-foot tall, weighs no less than 233 pounds depending on extra equipment, and can lift up to 44 pounds of cargo.


Nasa InSight Mars lander sends back 'beautiful' selfie from red planet's surface

The Independent - Tech

Nasa's brand new Mars lander has sent back the first stunning of the surface of the red planet, taken at the end of a terrifying journey. As well as showing the dusty red ground that is now the InSight lander's home, the photo marks a successful close to a journey that took seven months from Earth, and culminated with a nervy few hours as InSight blasted through the Martian atmosphere. The photograph, which shows the InSight spacecraft in the front and the Martian surface further on, is an incredible look at a world that has killed most of the landers that have tried to journey there. From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa's HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station.


Astronauts who crash landed after major launch failure will head back to ISS in same rocket

The Independent - Tech

The two astronauts involved in a crash landing after a Russian launch when wrong will head back up to space in the same rocket. The head of Russia's space agency said that the pair have been provisionally scheduled to fly back to the International Space Station in spring of next year. And his equivalent at Nasa said he had full confidence in the Soyuz rocket, despite the potentially catastrophic failure observed during the latest launch. From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa's HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station.


Japanese space agency to land Hayabusa-2 spacecraft on asteroid and carry samples back to Earth

The Independent - Tech

The Japanese space agency will land two robots on an asteroid next month – the latest step in historic plans to explore its surface and bring samples back to Earth. The mission to the 1km-wide space rock, known as Ryugu, could provide clues not only to the asteroid's formation but to the formation of our solar system. The Japanese space agency have now selected dates for the deployment of smaller crafts from Hayabusa-2 . From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa's HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station.


Nasa to launch emergency spacewalk after International Space Station computer breaks

The Independent - Tech

Astronauts are having to climb into space to fix a computer in an emergency move. Two inhabitants of the International Space Station (ISS) will have to venture out on a spacewalk to repair a computer part – a data relay box – that broke over the weekend. The broken computer means that the lab is floating over the Earth relying only on its second computer, potentially putting the astronauts on board at risk. From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa's HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station.


Next exoplanet or solar system discovery could be made accidentally by gamers, not by Nasa

The Independent - Tech

Nasa might have announced the biggest exoplanet find ever, but gamers are already gearing up find the next one. As scientists announced that they had found the "holy grail" of exoplanets – a solar system of seven worlds that could support life – a game announced that it was beginning the search for the next one. Massively multiplayer online game EVE Online has announced that it will be launching a search for planets orbiting our solar system, looking through the huge amount of data and images captured of other planets in our galaxy. From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa's HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station.


Winston Churchill's secret essay about existence of aliens revealed

The Independent - Tech

Winston Churchill thought deeply about the possibility of aliens and made a string of eerie predictions, according to a newly unearthed essay. With Europe on the brink of war, the former British prime minister mused at length on whether humanity is alone in the universe, and made a string of predictions about the possibility of finding it that turned out to be true. The 11-page article called "Are We Alone in the Universe?", From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset This image of an area on the surface of Mars, approximately 1.5 by 3 kilometers in size, shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. The image was taken by Nasa's HiRISE camera, which is mounted on its Mars Reconaissance Orbiter The Soyuz TMA-15M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, carrying three new astronauts to the International Space Station.