Guangdong


The Urban (Un) Seen "Artificial Intelligence as Future Space" / Bettina Zerza for the Shenzhen Biennale (UABB) 2019

#artificialintelligence

What happens when the sensor-imbued city acquires the ability to see – almost as if it had eyes? Ahead of the 2019 Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), titled "Urban Interactions," ArchDaily is working with the curators of the "Eyes of the City" section at the Biennial to stimulate a discussion on how new technologies – and Artificial Intelligence in particular – might impact architecture and urban life. Here you can read the "Eyes of the City" curatorial statement by Carlo Ratti, the Politecnico di Torino and SCUT. Technologies of the virtual realm present an opportunity to rethink the experience of space, society, and culture. They give us the possibility to engage with the city of the future, shaping the built environment of the 21st century.


Who Owns The Copyright Of AI-generated Content?

#artificialintelligence

The time has come for lawmakers to settle this debate before it's too late. Some days ago, a court in Shenzhen, China ruled that a creative work produced by artificial intelligence (AI) enjoyed copyright protection. With an increase in use case of AI in content generation, be it an article or a painting, whether such work attracts the provisions of a country's copyright act needs to be addressed. In the China case, an online platform accused of reproducing an informative article created by an AI tool without permission was asked to pay a fine for financial losses and for infringing copyright. The question left on the table though, was -- what about the copyright of those content owners whose works were used by the AI tool to generate that info article in the first place?


US government clips the wings of its civilian drone programme over Chinese spying fears

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The United States Government is to clip the wings of its civilian drone programme amidst continuing fears China could co-opt the tech to conduct espionage. Part of the 810-strong drone fleet -- used for such diverse tasks as monitoring endangered species and mapping landscapes -- was made by Chinese firm DJI. The move -- which will likely see the drones only fly in emergencies, such as to aid firefighting efforts -- builds on the temporary ban that began in October 2019. DJI Sciences and Technologies Ltd is a Chinese tech firm based out of Shenzhen, Guangdong province. The acronym DJI is short for'Dà-Jiāng Innovations'.


China has decided that article created by artificial intelligence (AI) is protected by copyright-Industry Global News24

#artificialintelligence

According to state news outlet China News Service, a court in Shenzhen, China, has ruled that an artificial intelligence (AI) generated article is protected by copyright, representing a notable milestone for AI's credentials as a creative force. Chinese tech giant Tencent has published content produced by automated software called Dreamwriter for the past five years, with an emphasis on business and financial stories. An online platform run by a company called Shanghai Yingxun Technology Company reproduced Tencent's AI-generated financial report on its own website in 2018. The article contained a disclaimer stating that it was "automatically written by Tencent Robot Dreamwriter;" however, the court found that the articulation and composition of the article had a "certain originality" and fulfilled the legal requirements to be recognized as a written work -- thereby applying for copyright. While the defendant had already deleted the report from its own website, a fine of 1,500 yuan ($217) was still payable.


Chinese court rules AI-written article is protected by copyright

#artificialintelligence

A court in Shenzhen, China, has ruled that an article generated by artificial intelligence (AI) is protected by copyright, according to state news outlet China News Service, representing a notable milestone for AI's credentials as a creative force. For the past five years Chinese tech titan Tencent has published content produced by automated software called Dreamwriter, with a focus on business and financial stories. In 2018, an online platform operated by a company called Shanghai Yingxun Technology Company replicated an AI-generated financial report from Tencent on its own website. The article included a disclaimer that said it was "automatically written by Tencent Robot Dreamwriter"; however, the court found that the article's articulation and expression had a "certain originality" and met the legal requirements to be classed as a written work -- thus it qualified for copyright protection. While the defendant had already removed the article from its own website, it was still required to pay a fine of 1,500 yuan ($217).


Robots, immune to fear or favour, are making China's foreign policy

#artificialintelligence

Stephen Chen investigates major research projects in China, a new power house of scientific and technological innovation. He has worked for the Post since 2006. He is an alumnus of Shantou University, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and the Semester at Sea programme which he attended with a full scholarship from the Seawise Foundation.


Conscious coupling

#artificialintelligence

When a survey in 2015 revealed that more than half of Guangzhou's female commuters had experienced some form of sexual harassment ("inappropriate touching") on public transport, a handful of Chinese cities began reserving subway cars for female commuters. But the designated carriages, which were sometimes labelled in pink Chinese characters with floral adornments, did little to deter men from squeezing aboard. "When everyone is rushing to work, no one cares whether it is a female-only car or not," one commuter complained on weibo. Indeed, many men have either blatantly ignored the restrictions or were oblivious to women-only subway carriages. Enforcement has lacked teeth – in part because the metro system is so overcrowded.


China prepares to unleash artificial intelligence to catch tax cheats

#artificialintelligence

Stephen Chen investigates major research projects in China, a new power house of scientific and technological innovation. He has worked for the Post since 2006. He is an alumnus of Shantou University, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and the Semester at Sea programme which he attended with a full scholarship from the Seawise Foundation.


Chinese Courts Rely on Blockchain to Resolve Legal Issues - Asia Blockchain Review - Gateway to Blockchain in Asia

#artificialintelligence

Courts in China are increasingly relying on blockchain technology and artificial intelligence to resolve legal issues through "smart internet courts," where witnesses communicate with virtual, AI-enabled judges. According to a Cointelegraph report, Xinhua state news agency revealed that over 3.1 million cases in the country were settled using the technologies in smart internet courts from March to October 2019. Xinhua reported that the smart courts are made up of virtual judges enabled by AI technology that can communicate with citizens through multiple screens. The first-ever smart court in China was introduced in 2017 in Hangzhou city, before the Chinese government expanded these courts to Beijing and Guangzhou. Zhang Wen, President of the Beijing Internet Court, has stated that these new courts have adopted both AI and blockchain technology to resolve legal issues.


China pig farm jams drones dropping swine fever-laced products onto its sites, but also GPS

The Japan Times

BEIJING – One of China's biggest animal feed producers said it had used a radio transmitter to combat crooks using drones to drop pork products contaminated with African swine fever on its pig farms, as part of a racket to profit from the health scare. In July, China's agriculture ministry said criminal gangs were faking outbreaks of swine fever on farms and forcing farmers to sell their healthy pigs at sharply lower prices. And Thursday, a state-backed news website, The Paper, reported that a pig farming unit of Beijing Dabeinong Technology Group Co. Ltd. had run foul of the regional aviation authority, as its transmitter had disrupted the GPS signal in the area. Answering questions from investors on an interactive platform run by the Shenzhen Stock Exchange, Dabeinong confirmed Friday that its pig farming unit in Heilongjiang province had unwittingly violated civil aviation rules. "Our unit in Heilongjiang province … to prevent external people from using drones to drop pork with African swine fever virus, violated regulations by using a drone control equipment set," the company said.